experimental

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (Nov 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency—Torvald Riegel

Discover how C++ evolves:

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

by Torvald Riegel

From the article:

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in November 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency. SG1 had a full schedule as usual, with Executors, Futures, and deferred reclamation mechanisms (e.g., RCU) being major discussion topics. We also started to track the state of proposals and topics we will need to discuss in a publicly accessible bug tracker...

C++ Coroutines: Understanding operator co_await—Lewis Baker

An article very complete!

C++ Coroutines: Understanding operator co_await

by Lewis Baker

From the article:

In the previous post on Coroutine Theory I described the high-level differences between functions and coroutines but without going into any detail on syntax and semantics of coroutines as described by the C++ Coroutines TS (N4680).

The key new facility that the Coroutines TS adds to the C++ language is the ability to suspend a coroutine, allowing it to be later resumed. The mechanism the TS provides for doing this is via the new co_await operator.

Understanding how the co_await operator works can help to demystify the behaviour of coroutines and how they are suspended and resumed. In this post I will be explaining the mechanics of the co_await operator and introduce the related Awaitable and Awaiter type concepts.

But before I dive into co_await I want to give a brief overview of the Coroutines TS to provide some context...

Implementing the spaceship operator for optional—Barry Revzin

The future implementation?

Implementing the spaceship operator for optional

by Barry Revzin

From the article:

Last week, the C++ Standards Committee added operator<=>, known as the spaceship operator, to the working draft for what will eventually become C++20. This is an exciting new language feature for two reasons: it allows you to write one function to do all your comparisons where you used to have to write six, and it also allows you to write zero functions — just declare the operator as defaulted and the compiler will do all the work for you! Exciting times...

Ranges, Coroutines, and React: Early Musings on the Future of Async in C++—Eric Niebler

Eric Niebler shares his thoughts about the interaction of ranges and co-routines in his recent blog post.

Ranges, Coroutines, and React: Early Musings on the Future of Async in C++

by Eric Niebler

From the article:

Another way to look at this is that synchronous ranges are an example of a pull-based interface: the user extracts elements from the range and processes them one at a time. Asynchronous ranges, on the other hand, represent more of a push-based model: things happen when data shows up, whenever that may be. This is akin to the reactive style of programming.

By using ranges and coroutines together, we unify push and pull based idioms into a consistent, functional style of programming. And that’s going to be important, I think.

Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Toronto, July 2017—Botond Ballo

Another report:

Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Toronto, July 2017

by Botond Ballo

From the article:

A couple of weeks ago I attended a meeting of the ISO C++ Standards Committee (also known as WG21) in Toronto, Canada (which, incidentally, is where I’m based). This was the second committee meeting in 2017; you can find my reports on previous meetings here (November 2016, Issaquah) and here (February 2017, Kona). These reports, particularly the Kona one, provide useful context for this post.