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experimental

CppCon 2016: Channels - An alternative to callbacks and futures—John Bandela

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Channels - An alternative to callbacks and futures

by John Bandela

(watch on YouTube)

Summary of the talk:

Currently in the C++ Networking TS and Concurrency TS, callbacks and futures are the means for communicating an asynchronous value. However, there are disadvantages with both. Callbacks are low overhead, but hard to compose. Futures are easy to compose, but have increased overhead. In this talk we will consider channels as a third alternatives that can have lower overhead than futures while still being easy to compose

corsl - Coroutine support library—Alexander Bessonov

Interesting library

corsl - Coroutine support library

by Alexander Bessonov

From the article:

corsl stands for "Coroutine Support Library" and consists of a number of utility classes and functions that simplify asynchronous programming in Windows. It is inspired by an amazing cppwinrt library, developed by Microsoft.

cppwinrt was created as a language projection for Windows Runtime, which is supported by Windows 8 or later operating systems. It is impossible to use in prior Windows versions.

One of the goals of corsl library was being able to use it under Windows Vista or later operating system...

C++Now 2017—Michael Park

Trip report!

C++Now 2017

by Michael Park

From the article:

I just returned from C++Now 2017 in Aspen, CO. This was my second time attending the conference and it was just as amazing as last year. My girlfriend decided to come along this time, since Aspen is such a beautiful place. We flew into Denver, rented a car and took the beautiful 4-hour drive into Aspen. She was very happy ��. Strongly recommended...

Using C++ Coroutines with Boost C++ Libraries—Eric Battalio

Working with the future tools.

Using C++ Coroutines with Boost C++ Libraries

by Eric Battalio

From the article:

Last month, Jim Springfield wrote a great article on using C++ Coroutines with Libuv (a multi-platform C library for asynchronous I/O). This month we will look at how to use coroutines with components of Boost C++ libraries, namely boost::future and boost::asio...

CppCon 2016: Using Types Effectively—Ben Deane

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Using Types Effectively

by Ben Deane

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

C++ has a pretty good type system, and modern C++ gives us a greater ability than ever before to use that type system for good: to make APIs easier to use and harder to misuse, to make our datatypes more closely express our intent, and generally to make code safer, more obvious in function and perhaps even faster.

This is an interactive session - incorporating games played between presenter and audience, even - taking a look at choices available to us as datatype and API designers, and examining how a little knowledge about the algebra of algebraic datatypes can help. We'll see why std::optional and (hopefully soon) std::variant will quickly become an essential part of everyone's toolbox, and also explore how types can be used to express not just the structure of data, but also the behaviour of objects and functions.

ACCU 2017 trip report—Anastasia Kazakova

You want to know what happened?

ACCU 2017 trip report

by Anastasia Kazakova

From the article:

Hi,

We’ve just returned from ACCU 2017 in Bristol, UK. Being amazed by the event I decided to share some notes here, and hope Phil will also jump in and share his impression. There are also reports by Vittorio Romeo, Simon Brand and Samathy Barratt which you might find interesting...

Understand ranges better with the new Cartesian Product adaptor—Jonathan Boccara

The future explained:

Understand ranges better with the new Cartesian Product adaptor

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

A couple of days ago, the range-v3 library got a new component: the view::cartesian_product adaptor.

Understanding what this component does, and the thought process that went through its creation is easy and will let you have a better grasp of the range library. (Note that you could just as well understand all the following by looking at the zip adaptor. But cartesian_product is brand new, so let’s discover this one, in order to hit two birds with one stone)...

An Introduction to Reflection in C++—Jackie Kay

What's the status of reflection in C++?

An Introduction to Reflection in C++

by Jackie Kay

From the article:

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. You are working on a messaging middleware, a game engine, a UI library, or any other large software project that has to deal with an ever-growing, ever-changing number of objects. These objects have many different qualities but can be grouped by their functionality: they can be sent across the network or collided with or rendered.

Because you are a good programmer who believes in the DRY principle, you want to write the “action” code that does the stuff on these objects without repetition, and plug in specific Message types or Renderable types into your generic pipeline at the appropriate places. It would be really nice to compose objects hierarchally: for example, if I had a widget class composed of several different renderable Rectangles, I want to be able to automatically generate the rendering code for my widget based on the existing rendering logic for its constituent shapes...