basics

Keynotes at Meeting C++ 2017

With the conference just a few weeks away, an update on the 3 awesome keynotes of this years Meeting C++:

Keynotes at Meeting C++ 2017

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Are you excited for Meeting C++ 2017?!? I quickly wanted to give an update on the 3 keynotes at the conference this year! Each day will feature one keynote, where the first two are in the morning, while the Closing Keynote is kind of the last thing to happen before the closing message. Also, all 3 keynote speakers have now (finally) their speaker profile.

Static libs do not modular make—Thomas Young

An article about static libraries, the benefits (or non-benefits) of splitting your project into static libraries, and the knock-on effects this can have on project dependencies.

Static libs do not modular make

by Thomas Young

From the article:

A cautionary tale about statically-linked libraries, as generated by C/C++ build tools.

As a project accumulates features, and complexity, it gets harder to understand exactly what's going on, and to find your way around the source code. You need to find some way to organise the code and try and keep things manageable.

A common idea, in this situation, is to group some source files together to split out as a static library.

I'm going to argue that this actually does very little, in itself, to increase modularity, can have the effect of significantly increasing dependencies, and is maybe not such a good idea, after all.

Volunteer at Meeting C++ 2017

For the first time ever, you can participate in Meeting C++ as a volunteer, just like you could do with CppCon!

Volunteering at Meeting C++ 2017

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Something new, which didn't exist in the last 5 editions of the Meeting C++ conference. You are now able to become a volunteer at Meeting C++ 2017, like you can and always could do for CppCon.

Historically the staff for Meeting C++ first was from my own C++ User Group...

The main() Course—Adi Shavit

A fanciful little post about li’l old main().

The main() Course

by Adi Shavit

From the article:

The function main() is a normal program’s entry point.

The shortest conforming C++ executable program is: int main(){}