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Quick Q: Syntax of final, override, const with trailing return types

Quick A: The signature of the function is first.

Recently on SO:

Syntax of final, override, const with trailing return types

The correct syntax should be:

  • override and final should appear after the member function declaration, which including the trailing return type specification, i.e.
auto debug(ostream& os=cout) const ->ostream& override final;
  • override and final should not be used with the member function definition outside the class definition, so just remove them:
auto Derived::debug(ostream& os) const ->ostream&
{
  os << "dval: " << dval << endl;
  return os;
}

HPX version 1.0 released—STE||AR Group

The STE||AR Group has released V1.0 of HPX -- A C++ Standard library for parallelism and concurrency.

HPX V1.0 Released

The newest version of HPX (V1.0) is now available for download! Please see here for the release notes.

HPX exposes an API fully conforming to the concurrency related parts of the C++11/C++14/C++17 standards, extended and applied to distributed and heterogeneous computing, and aligned with the ongoing standardization discussions.

From the announcement:

  • HPX is a general purpose parallel C++ runtime system for applications of any scale. It implements all of the related facilities as defined by the C++ Standard. As of this writing, HPX provides the only widely available open-source implementation of the new C++17 parallel algorithms. Additionally, HPX implements functionalities proposed as part of the ongoing C++ standardization process, such as large parts of the C++ Concurrency TS, task blocks, data-parallel algorithms, executors, index-based parallel for loops, and many more. It also extends the existing C++ Standard APIs to the distributed case (e.g. compute clusters) and for heterogeneous systems (e.g. GPUs).
  • HPX seamlessly enables a new asynchronous C++ Standard Programming Model which tends to improve the parallel efficiency of our applications and helps reduce complexities usually associated with concurrency

 

CppCast Episode 98: Hippomocks and cpp-dependencies with Peter Bindel

Episode 98 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Peter Bindels to discuss the Hippomocks mocking library and the cpp-dependencies tool he worked on that was open sourced from TomTom.

CppCast Episode 98: Hippomocks and cpp-dependencies with Peter Bindel

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Peter Bindels is a C++ software engineer who prides himself on writing code that is easy to use, easy to work with and well-readable to anybody familiar with the language. He's worked for a contractor for a few years and then made the switch to work at Tomtom, where he's been working on various parts of the software chain, last of which was a major cleanup in the navigation code base. In doing so he developed a tool to determine, check and improve dependencies between components, which allows quicker structural insight in complicated systems. He also created HippoMocks in 2008, one of the first full fledged C++ mocking frameworks that is still a relevant choice today. He has given two talks at Meeting C++ 2016 and will be giving his third talk, on Mocking in C++, at CppNow 2017.

Boost 1.64.0 is released

The new boost is out!

Boost 1.64.0 is released

From the article:

New Libraries


Process:
Process library by Klemens D. Morgenstern, that provides cross platorm ways to allows you to:

  • create child processes
  • setup streams for child processes
  • communicate with child processes through streams (synchronously or asynchronously)
  • wait for processes to exit (synchronously or asynchronously)
  • terminate processes

Broken feature:

GitHub #67: "group.wait() does not return".

Updated Libraries

Any:

  • Suppressed false warnings about returning reference to temporary
  • boost::addressof is now used instead of directly taking the address #12615
  • Headers are not included using double quotes any more #12053
  • CI tests now run with address, leak, and undefined sanitizers
  • Added more test

Atomic:

  • Fixed possible incorrect code generation in 64-bit atomic operations on 32-bit x86 with gcc versions older than 4.7 and compatible compilers.

Config:

  • Added BOOST_NO_CXX11_SFINAE_EXPR defect detection.

...

Overload 138 is now available

ACCU’s Overload journal of April 2017 is out. It contains the following C++ related articles.

Overload 138 is now available

From the journal:

Breadth First, Depth First, Test First
You can approach a problem top-down or bottom-up. Frances Buontempo wonders if algorithms can help us choose the most appropriate direction. by Frances Buontempo

Space invaders in Elm
Elm is a functional language which compiles to JavaScript. Ossi Hanhinen provides an overview. by Ossi Hanhinen

Single Module Builds – The Fastest Heresy in Town
Unity builds can be controversial. Andy Thomason shows how much difference they can make to build times. by Andy Thomason

An Interview: Emyr Williams
CVu has been running a series of interviews. Frances Buontempo interviews the interviewer, Emyr Williams. by Frances Buontempo

(Not Really So) New Niche for C++: Browser!?
How do you run C++ in a browser? Sergey Ignatchenko demonstrates how to use Emscripten. by Sergey Ignatchenko

Contractual Loopholes
Compilers can optimise away functions you may want to time. Deák Ferenc explores ways to stop this happening. by Deák Ferenc

All About the Base
Representing numbers presents many choices. Teedy Deigh counts the ways. by Teedy Deigh

C++ Jobs and Predictions—Bartlomiej Filipek

Is C++ job market falling or growing? Since billions of lines of code are already written it's not possible to disappear in a second. So what's the current state and the future?

C++ Jobs and Predictions

by Bartlomiej Filipek

From the article:

... if you like this area you'll be able to find a C++ job anyway. I hope C++20 will add another good reason to stick with C++ and even move from other languages... but we need to wait a few years to see it happening.

Understand ranges better with the new Cartesian Product adaptor—Jonathan Boccara

The future explained:

Understand ranges better with the new Cartesian Product adaptor

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

A couple of days ago, the range-v3 library got a new component: the view::cartesian_product adaptor.

Understanding what this component does, and the thought process that went through its creation is easy and will let you have a better grasp of the range library. (Note that you could just as well understand all the following by looking at the zip adaptor. But cartesian_product is brand new, so let’s discover this one, in order to hit two birds with one stone)...

An Introduction to Reflection in C++—Jackie Kay

What's the status of reflection in C++?

An Introduction to Reflection in C++

by Jackie Kay

From the article:

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before. You are working on a messaging middleware, a game engine, a UI library, or any other large software project that has to deal with an ever-growing, ever-changing number of objects. These objects have many different qualities but can be grouped by their functionality: they can be sent across the network or collided with or rendered.

Because you are a good programmer who believes in the DRY principle, you want to write the “action” code that does the stuff on these objects without repetition, and plug in specific Message types or Renderable types into your generic pipeline at the appropriate places. It would be really nice to compose objects hierarchally: for example, if I had a widget class composed of several different renderable Rectangles, I want to be able to automatically generate the rendering code for my widget based on the existing rendering logic for its constituent shapes...