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Traveling for C++ - a trip report about C++Now and NDC Oslo

I just published the trip report for C++Now and NDC Oslo:

Traveling for C++ - a trip report about C++Now and NDC Oslo

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Things have changed a little bit since I first visited C++Now in 2012. Today I do quite a lot of traveling for C++ and Meeting C++. I've been to Aspen in May to visit C++Now for the 4th time, and just returned from NDC Oslo...

CppCon 2014 The Committee Experience—Alisdair Meredith

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

The Committee Experience

by Alisdair Meredith

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

What happens behind the closed doors of the ISO Standard Committee? And just how closed are they?

The session collects some anecdotes and relates what it is like to get involved in the process of standardizing C++, from the perspective of someone attending their first meeting - me 10 years ago! - to now. We will hear some of the highs and lows along the way to C++11, some misconceptions of what might be involved, and get some idea of what happens during a typical standard meeting, and between.

By the end you will have some idea of how the standard itself is actually formed, and hopefully spark the interest of folks who might be interested in getting involved themselves...

Cache-friendly binary search—Joaquín M López Muñoz

An interesting approach to sorted search:

Cache-friendly binary search

by Joaquín M López Muñoz

From the article:

High-speed memory caches present in modern computer architectures favor data structures with good locality of reference, i.e. the property by which elements accessed in sequence are located in memory addresses close to each other. This is the rationale behind classes such as Boost.Container flat associative containers, that emulate the functionality of standard C++ node-based associative containers while storing the elements contiguously (and in order)...

CppCon 2014 cppreference.com: documenting C++ one edit at a time—Nate Kohl

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

cppreference.com: documenting C++ one edit at a time

by Nate Kohl

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

How do you convert hundreds of pages of C++ standardese into a resource that is accessible to software engineers around the world? This talk will describe the process of building a community-run website that documents all of the nooks and dark corners of the C++ programming language. I'll look back at the history of how C++ was defined, cover the current state of documentation, examine the pros and cons of running a fairly high-profile publicly-editable wiki, and try to guess at what the future holds.

Bitesize Modern C++: nullptr—Glennan Carnie

An article about the null value of a pointer:

Bitesize Modern C++: nullptr

by Glennan Carnie

From the article:

What’s the value of a null pointer?

  • 0
  • NULL
  • NUL

No doubt you’ve been involved in the (always heated) discussions about which is the correct one (By the way, if you said NUL you need to take yourself to one side and give yourself a stern talking to)...

Fun with Lambdas: C++14 Style (Part 4)—Sumant Tambe

More rapid-fire “now write this using lambdas” problem-solution drill with Sumant Tambe:

Fun with Lambdas: C++14 Style (Part 4)

by Sumant Tambe

From the article:

C++14 has a number of features that support functional-style design. By "functional-style" I mean heavy use of higher-order functions (functions that take other functions as arguments). Quite often arguments to the higher-order functions are lambdas (closures, to be precise). With automatic return type deduction for normal functions, writing higher-order function becomes very easy and seamless in C++14...

Set-up and tear-down—Andrzej Krzemieński

Today, you have an article about a specific aspect of unit-testing:

Set-up and tear-down

by Andrzej Krzemieński

From the article:

Recently as part of program run-time performance optimization effort, I was scanning through the code for occurrences of keyword new. The goal was to find unnecessary memory allocations. I was surprised to find most of news in the unit test module. Not that there was any particular need for memory allocation: it is just that the framework that was chosen (a fairly popular one) enforces on the programmers bad practices of manually controlling the life-time of their objects...

CppCast Episode 18: POCO Project with Aleksandar Fabijanic

Episode 18 of CppCast the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers.In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Aleksandar Fabijanic to discuss the C++ Portable Components project.

CppCast Episode 18: POCO Project with Aleksandar Fabijanic

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Alex holds two undergraduate degrees in mechanical engineering from Faculty of Engineering (University of Rijeka, Croatia) and the master's degree in software engineering from Citadel Graduate College in Charleston, South Carolina. Alex is a IEEE Computer Society Certified Software Development Professional. He's been seriously programming computers since 1992 and developing steel manufacturing automation and process control software using C and C++ since 1998. He used to compete in rowing on World Championship/Olympic Games level. Nowadays, he spends his free time reading, exercising and occasionally woodworking.

C++ on the Web: ponies for developers without pwn’ing users—JF Bastien

Another video coming from NDC:

C++ on the Web: ponies for developers without pwn’ing users

by JF Bastien

What you will find in the video:

Delivering a program through a web browser really shouldn't force it to be slower than executing it directly on your OS. Similarly, doing so shouldn't force you to rewrite programs that target venerable, cornerstone native programming APIs—modern C++ STL, OpenGL, files and processes—nor should it forbid you from taking advantage of C++’s concurrency and parallelism in order to meet programming challenges like resource-constrained devices, battery-starved devices, and high performance code. Oh, and the browser should keep users secure from malicious sites.
In this presentation we'll showcase some resource-intensive applications that have been compiled for the PNaCl platform and, unsurprisingly, worked just like native code. These include a full development environment, complete with LLVM and your favorite build system and editor, all in an architecture- and OS-agnostic packaging. Then, we'll describe how we deliver native code on the web securely, so developers get their C++ ponies and users don’t get pwn’d. We’ll also touch on the fuzzing, code randomization and sandboxing that keep 1B+ users safe.