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CppCon 2014 UI prototyping and development for multiple devices in C++—John “JT” Thomas

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

UI prototyping and development for multiple devices in C++

by John "JT" Thomas

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Using C++ for multi-device user interface and app development should be pretty straightforward. However, since the Standard C++ Language and Library specification does not specify a user interface library, it's actually quite challenging given that the two leading mobile platforms provide non-C++ User Interface APIs. Even more challenging is the new world of mobile devices and the myriad form factors, layouts, resolutions, sensors, and services that an application developer has to deal with. Plus, the deployment model for remote devices makes testing UI changes slower due to the increased build and turnaround time. This session will describe how C++ can be used effectively for multi-device UI development and also deliver a rapid prototyping experience to minimize the deployment time to the device for testing.

Using Monads in C++ to Solve Constraints: 4. Refactoring—Bartosz Milewski

Time for refactoring functional code! Bartosz Milewski concludes his intriguing journey about the application of Monads in C++.

Using Monads in C++ to Solve Constraints: 4. Refactoring

by Bartosz Milewski

From the article:

In this installment I’d like to talk about something that a lot of functional programmers swear by: Functional programs are amazingly easy to factorize.

Acting In C++—Anthony DaSilva Jr

You will find here an article about:

Acting In C++

by Anthony DaSilva Jr

From the article:

Because they’re a perfect fit for mega-core processors and they’re safer and more enjoyable to program than raw, multi-threaded, systems, I’ve been a fan of Actor-based concurrent systems ever since I experimented with Erlang and Akka (via its Java API). Thus, as a C++ programmer, I was excited to discover the “C++ Actor Framework” (CAF). Like the Akka toolkit/runtime, the CAF is based on the design of the longest living, proven, production-ready, pragmatic, actor-based, language that I know of – the venerable Erlang programming language...

STL Concepts and Ranges—Eric Niebler

Here is a video of Eric Niebler presenting a future C++:

STL Concepts and Ranges

by Eric Niebler

From the video:

With concepts and ranges coming, big changes are in store for the Standard Library and for the style of idiomatic C++. The effort to redefine the Standard Library is picking up pace. Come hear about one potential future from one of the key people driving the change. In this talk, Eric works through a tricky example and shows an elegant solution rooted both in yesterday's STL and tomorrow's. He will speak briefly about where we are in the process to reinvent and reinvigorate the Standard Library.

CppCon 2014 Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part II—Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part II

by Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Network programming in C++ frequently requires programmers to find a way to express C++ objects as a sequence of bytes which can be transmitted and reconstructed on another network endpoint. In the case of simpler objects (such as most PODs), object serialization is trivial to perform.

For more complex C++ constructs (polymorphic objects, etc), the approach to serialization is more challenging. This talk will discuss how two powerful Boost libraries, Asio and Serialization, can be used to craft C++ networking code that can handle a vast array of uses cases. A prototype for a message passing framework will be developed throughout the talk.

Programmers familiar with or interested in network programming (but perhaps unfamiliar with Boost.Asio, Boost.Serialization or both) are the intended audience. No prior knowledge of Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization will be assumed, and alternatives to both libraries will be discussed.

CppCast Episode 12: Modern C++ for the Windows Runtime with Kenny Kerr

Episode 12 of CppCast the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Kenny Kerr to talk about Modern C++ for the Windows Runtime. Kenny also shares his thoughts on printf and tells us about his new Pluralsight course.

CppCast Episode 12: Modern C++ for the Windows Runtime with Kenny Kerr

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Kenny Kerr is a computer programmer and recognized expert in Windows operating system development and programming languages. Kenny has published numerous articles about the Windows operating system, network security, and C++ for MSDN Magazine as well as other publications. Microsoft has recognized Kenny’s expertise in network and operating system security with the Microsoft MVP Award for security. He has also held the Microsoft MVP Award since 2007 for his contributions to the C++ development community.

CppCon 2014 Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part I—Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part I

by Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Network programming in C++ frequently requires programmers to find a way to express C++ objects as a sequence of bytes which can be transmitted and reconstructed on another network endpoint. In the case of simpler objects (such as most PODs), object serialization is trivial to perform.

For more complex C++ constructs (polymorphic objects, etc), the approach to serialization is more challenging. This talk will discuss how two powerful Boost libraries, Asio and Serialization, can be used to craft C++ networking code that can handle a vast array of uses cases. A prototype for a message passing framework will be developed throughout the talk.

Programmers familiar with or interested in network programming (but perhaps unfamiliar with Boost.Asio, Boost.Serialization or both) are the intended audience. No prior knowledge of Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization will be assumed, and alternatives to both libraries will be discussed.

C++ Best Practices: A Forkable Standards Document - Jason Turner

A forkable coding standards and best practices document for C++.

C++ Best Practices

by Jason Turner

From the book

It (C++ Best Practices) compliments books such as Effective C++ (Meyers) and C++ Coding Standards (Alexandrescu, Sutter). We fill in some of the lower level details that they don't discuss and provide specific stylistic recommendations while also discussing how to ensure overall code quality.

...

This document is based on my personal experiences. You are not supposed to agree with it 100%. It exists as a book on github so that you can fork it for your own uses or submit back proposed changes for everyone to share.

 

Using Monads in C++ to Solve Constraints: 3. The Tale of Two Monads—Bartosz Milewski

Bartosz Milewski continues to explain how to use Monads in C++.

Using Monads in C++ to Solve Constraints: 3. The Tale of Two Monads

by Bartosz Milewski

From the article:

The functional solution to our problem involves the combination of the list monad and the state monad. Mashing two monads together is not trivial — in Haskell this is done using monad transformers — but here I’ll show you how to do it manually...

CppCon 2014 Sanitize your C++ code—Kostya Serebryany

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Sanitize your C++ code

by Kostya Serebryany

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

"Sanitizers" is a family of dynamic testing tools built into C++ compilers (Clang and GCC):
AddressSanitizer finds memory errors, such as use-after-free, buffer overflows, and leaks;
ThreadSanitizer finds data races, deadlocks, and other threading bugs;
MemorySanitizer finds uses of uninitialized memory;
UndefinedBehaviorSanitizer finds other kinds of undefined behavior, such as use of incorrect dynamic type, shift by illegal amount and many others.
You will learn how these tools work, how to use them on small programs and how we deploy them in large projects.