Standardization

Standard Ranges—Eric Niebler

Coming soon.

Standard Ranges

by Eric Niebler

From the article:

As you may have heard by now, Ranges got merged and will be part of C++20. This is huge news and represents probably the biggest shift the Standard Library has seen since it was first standardized way back in 1998.

This has been a long time coming. Personally, I’ve been working toward this since at least November 2013, when I opined, “In my opinion, it’s time for a range library for the modern world,” in a blog post on input ranges. Since then, I’ve been busy building that modern range library and nailing down its specification with the help of some very talented people.

Future blog posts will discuss how we got here and the gritty details of how the old stuff and the new stuff play together (we’re C++ programmers, we love gritty details), but this post is strictly about the what...

SG20 Education and Recommended Videos for Teaching C++—Christopher Di Bella

In today’s blog, we look at both the newly minted Study Group for education in the C++ Standard Committee. We also look at a small number of conference videos that I recommend teachers consider while they’re waiting for this Study Group to produce usable materials.

SG20 Education and Recommended Videos for Teaching C++

by Christopher Di Bella

From the article:

As articulated in P1231, the goal of SG20 is not to provide normative curricula for teaching C++, but rather to provide teaching and curriculum guidelines.

...

Below are a list of conference videos that I’ve compiled for teachers to watch (and will update if recommendations come in). There’s well over a day’s worth of videos below, but these aren’t a random assortment of my favourite conference videos. Rather, they are sessions that communicate values about:

  • teaching people how to write programs using C++, or
  • writing C++ programs using approaches the community agrees produce better code.

Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in San Diego, November 2018—Botond Ballo

New trip report.

Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in San Diego, November 2018

by Botond Ballo

From the article:

A few weeks ago I attended a meeting of the ISO C++ Standards Committee (also known as WG21) in San Diego, California. This was the third committee meeting in 2018; you can find my reports on preceding meetings here (June 2018, Rapperswil) and here (March 2018, Jacksonville), and earlier ones linked from those. These reports, particularly the Rapperswil one, provide useful context for this post...

San Diego Committee Meeting: A Trip Report—Corentin Jabot

Trip report.

San Diego Committee Meeting: A Trip Report

by Corentin Jabot

From the article:

As I left Rapperswil earlier this year, I said very firmly that I would not go to the San Diego Meeting.

Crossing an ocean to work on C++ 12 hours a day for a week is indeed madness.

And so naturally, I found myself in a San Diego hotel straight from the 60s, to do some C++ for a week. With the exception of the author of this blog, all people there are incredibly smart and energetic, and so a lot of great work was done...

Trip Report: Freestanding in San Diego—Ben Craig

One more report.

Trip Report: Freestanding in San Diego

by Ben Craig

From the article:

All three are dealing with "freestanding". I've been working for the last year or so trying to redefine freestanding in a way that would be useful to more people. I have personal experience using C++ in various operating system kernels / drivers, and a bit of experience working on micro controllers and digital signal processors, so that's where my papers focused. At the CppCon 2018 SG14 meeting, some GPU companies have said that my definitions are useful for their architectures (with some tweaks), and I've heard from several other people that my definitions are even useful in some environments where performance and determinism are key, even when there is an OS. I'm still trying to figure out if and how to incorporate all these groups into one thing that could get standardized.

I pitched "Freestanding Proposal" at my first WG21 meeting was November of 2017 in Albuquerque. I was an unknown then. San Diego was my third WG21 meeting. All the papers and interviews and trip reports have now made it where people were asking me about freestanding quite frequently. There were a few times I got stopped while walking around by someone I had never talked to before, and they knew who I was, and asked about freestanding. I found this very flattering. I'm thrilled (and terrified) that my work is getting such visibility...

Trip report: Fall ISO C++ standards meeting (San Diego)—Herb Sutter

Fresh from last week's standards meeting:

Trip report: Fall ISO C++ standards meeting (San Diego)

by Herb Sutter

From the article:

On Saturday November 10, the ISO C++ committee completed its fall meeting in San Diego, California, USA, hosted with thanks by Qualcomm. This was the biggest ISO C++ meeting in our 29-year history, with some 180 people at the meeting, representing 12 nations...

Because this is one of the last meetings for adding features to C++20, we gave priority to proposals that might make C++20, and we adopted a number of them for C++20...

2018 San Diego ISO C++ Committee Trip Report

The report is here!

2018 San Diego ISO C++ Committee Trip Report

From the article:

The ISO C++ Committee met in San Diego, California ���� last week to continue work on the next International Standard (IS), C++20. This meeting was the last meeting to consider new proposals for C++20, but existing proposals like modules (on track) and coroutines (questions remain) that are in flight but not merged can still make C++20. We’ll make our final decisions about major language features at the next meeting.

Pre-trip report: Fall ISO C++ standards meeting (San Diego)—Herb Sutter

An update in advance of the meeting that begins later today:

Pre-trip report: Fall ISO C++ standards meeting (San Diego)

by Herb Sutter

From the article:

In one hour, our fall meeting will begin. I’ll still write a trip report at the end with the results of the meeting, but because this is an unusually (and historically) large meeting we’ve had to make a few adjustments...

Five Awesome C++ Papers for San Diego—Bartlomiej Filipek

What do you think?

Five Awesome C++ Papers for San Diego

By Bartlomiej Filipek

From the article:

In two weeks there will be a next C++ Committee meeting. This time the group of C++ experts will travel to San Diego, and they will discuss the shape of the upcoming C++ Standards. As far as I know, the meeting will hold a record in the number of submissions (276 proposals!) So it seems that the session will be quite exhausting smile

Here’s my list of five exciting papers that will be discussed during the meeting. I tried to pick something less popular, and usually smaller than significant features like modules, concepts or ranges...