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efficiency

CppCon 2016: Turning Particle-Astro-Physicist-Hackers into Software Engineers—Alex Olivas

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Turning Particle-Astro-Physicist-Hackers into Software Engineers

by Alex Olivas

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Want to increase software literacy in your organization? In this talk I'll present programs I've developed over the last year to teach C++ software engineering principles to graduate students and postdocs on the IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory. I believe similar programs could be beneficial to all types of organizations, from scientific collaborations to professional software shops.

IceCube is a kilometer-scale high energy neutrino observatory located deep in the Antarctic ice at the geographic South Pole. IceCube studies physics in energy regimes ranging from the most energetic processes in the visible universe (several orders of magnitude greater than the collision energies at the Large Hadron Collider), to dark matter detection at the 100 GeV scale. It is a relatively large collaboration, consisting of roughly 300 physicists and engineers from 48 institutions from a dozen different countries. IceCube has been collecting data for over 11 years (going into our 6th season with the fully completed detector) and is expected to run for at least another decade.

Many large scientific projects, which often run for decades, rely on code developed by hackers, who's focus and passion is rarely software engineering. Their primary passion, understandably, is the field for which they found themselves writing code. To make matters worse, the amount of work and focus required to secure a career in their chosen field often leaves little time and energy to devote to honing the skills needed to develop production quality code. Many students and postdocs often have, at best, a cursory understanding of the programming language(s) that comprise the experiment's codebase.

C++ has become the primary programming language for High Energy Physics (HEP) and will likely continue to be for decades to come. Consider, for example, that ROOT, GEANT, and Pythia to name a few critical HEP libraries are written in C++. Over the last year on IceCube, I've developed several comprehensive internal training programs in an attempt to bridge the gap between the scientist-hacker and the professional C++ software engineer. In this session I'd like to present the challenges I've encountered over the last year and my plans for extending these programs to the High Energy Physics community through the HEP Software Foundation.

The reviews at r/cpp_review have begun!

Participate in the first two reviews at r/cpp_review:

The reviews have begun

by Jens Weller

From the article

A few weeks ago I announced a C++ review community, which since then has grown to 250+ members on reddit. There has been great feedback and discussions since then, so that the idea is now ready to be tested.  With August, the first review period has started

CppCon 2016: Asynchronous IO with Boost.Asio—Michael Caisse

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Asynchronous IO with Boost.Asio

by Michael Caisse

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Reactive systems are found everywhere. The temptation to implement them with legions of waiting threads can be strong; however, the result is nearly always disappointing. The Boost.Asio library provides a framework to handle asynchronous resources with specific classes directed toward networking, serial port I/O, timers and more. In this session we will introduce Asio and some best practices while implementing a simple TCP client and server.

Asio has been submitted to the C++ Standards Committee for inclusion and can be found in the Boost library collection or as a stand-alone version. Come and learn a better way to implement reactive systems with the Asynchronous I/O library.

C++ Weekly Episode 75: Why You Cannot Move From Const—Jason Turner

Episode 75 of C++ Weekly.

Why You Cannot Move From Const

by Jason Turner

About the show:

You may have noticed that it's possible to use std::move with a const object, but have you stopped to consider what it does? What you think is a move is silently reverting to a copy without your knowing. In this episode Jason explains what is happening and why.

CppCon 2016: Iterator Haiku—Casey Carter

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Iterator Haiku

by Casey Carter

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Iterator Haiku: How five iterator categories blossomed into seven, and Sentinels trimmed them back to five again. Recently proposed changes to the ranges TS distill its seven iterator categories back to five without sacrificing any expressive power. Removing operations that are extraneous in the Sentinel world eliminates a potential source of programming errors.

CppCon 2016: Constant Fun—Dietmar Kühl

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Constant Fun

by Dietmar Kühl

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

This presentation discusses why it is useful to move some of the processing to compile time and shows some applications of doing so. In particular it shows how to create associative containers created at compile time and what is needed from the types involved to make it possible. The presentation also does some analysis to estimate the costs in terms for compile-time and object file size.

Specifically, the presentation discusses:
- implications of static and dynamic initialization – the C++ language rules for implementing constexpr functions and classes supporting constexpr objects.
- differences in error handling with constant expressions.
- sorting sequences at compile time and the needed infrastructure – creating constant associative containers with compile-time and run-time look-up.

Yielding Generators—Kirit Sælensminde

The series continue!

Yielding Generators

by Kirit Sælensminde

From the article:

We've seen how the promise_type together with the coroutine return type handles the interactions between the caller and the coroutine itself.

Our target is to be able to do something pretty simple:

generator count() {
    std::cout << "Going to yield 1" << std::endl;
    co_yield 1;
    std::cout << "Going to yield 2" << std::endl;
    co_yield 2;
    std::cout << "Going to yield 3" << std::endl;
    co_yield 3;
    std::cout << "count() is done" << std::endl;
}

CppCon 2016: C++ Coroutines: Under the covers—Gor Nishanov

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

C++ Coroutines: Under the covers

by Gor Nishanov

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Coroutines feel like magic. Functions that can suspend and resume in the middle of the execution without blocking a thread! We will look under the covers to see what transformations compilers perform on coroutines, what happens when a coroutine is started, suspended, resumed or cancelled. We will look at optimizations that can make a coroutine disappear into thin air.