performance

HPX V1.4 released -- STE||AR Group

The STE||AR Group has released V1.4 of HPX -- A C++ Standard library for parallelism and concurrency.

HPX V1.4 Released

The newest version of HPX (V1.4) is now available for download! This release focuses on performance and stability improvements. Please see here for the full release notes.

    HPX is a general purpose parallel C++ runtime system for applications of any scale. It implements all of the related facilities as defined by the C++ Standard. As of this writing, HPX provides the only widely available open-source implementation of the new C++17 parallel algorithms. Additionally, HPX implements functionalities proposed as part of the ongoing C++ standardization process, such as large parts of the C++ Concurrency TS, Parallelism TS V2, data-parallel algorithms, executors, and many more. It also extends the existing C++ Standard APIs to the distributed case (e.g. compute clusters) and for heterogeneous systems (e.g. GPUs).

    HPX seamlessly enables a new Asynchronous C++ Standard Programming Model that tends to improve the parallel efficiency of our applications and helps reducing complexities usually associated with parellism and concurrency.

 

CppCon 2018: OOP Is Dead, Long Live Data-oriented Design--Stoyan Nikolov

We’re in the final countdown to this year’s CppCon, which starts on September 16. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, here’s another of the top-rated talks from last year. Enjoy – and register today for CppCon 2019!

OOP Is Dead, Long Live Data-oriented Design

by Stoyan Nikolov

Summary of the talk:

For decades C++ developers have built software around OOP concepts that ultimately failed us - we didn’t see the promises of code reuse, maintenance or simplicity fulfilled, and performance suffers significantly. Data-oriented design can be a better paradigm in fields where C++ is most important - game development, high-performance computing, and real-time systems.

The talk will briefly introduce data-oriented design and focus on practical real-world examples of applying DoD where previously OOP constructs were widely employed.

Examples will be shown from modern web browsers. They are overwhelmingly written in C++ with OOP - that’s why most of them are slow memory hogs. In the talk I’ll draw parallels between the design of systems in Chrome and their counterparts in the HTML renderer Hummingbird. As we’ll see, Hummingbird is multiple times faster because it ditches OOP for good in all performance-critical areas.

We will see how real-world C++ OOP systems can be re-designed in a C++ data-oriented way for better performance, scalability, maintainability and testability.