performance

Taming the power of C++ with AI

A new blog article on an exciting idea for C++

Taming the power of C++ with AI

by Jens Weller

From the article:

In January Bryce Adelstein Lelbach gave a talk about NDVIDIAS CUDASTL fork at my online C++ User Group. Shortly after this talk was published on YouTube I got contacted by a start up, seeking feedback on their ideas of accelerating C++ with help of GPUs and AI...

HPX V1.6.0 released -- STE||AR Group

The STE||AR Group has released V1.6.0 of HPX -- A C++ Standard library for parallelism and concurrency.

HPX V1.6.0 Released

The newest version of HPX (V1.6.0) is now available for download! This release continues the focus on C++20 conformance with multiple new algorithms adapted to be C++20 conformant and becoming customization point objects (CPOs). We have added experimental support for HIP, allowing existing CUDA features to now be compiled with hipcc and run on AMD GPUs as well. We have also continued improving the performance of the parallel executors, and added an experimental fork-join executor. The full list of improvements, fixes, and breaking changes can be found in the release notes.

    HPX is a general purpose parallel C++ runtime system for applications of any scale. It implements all of the related facilities as defined by the C++ Standard. As of this writing, HPX provides the only widely available open-source implementation of the new C++17 parallel algorithms. Additionally, HPX implements functionalities proposed as part of the ongoing C++ standardization process, such as large parts of the features related parallelism and concurrency as specified by the upcoming C++20 Standard, the C++ Concurrency TS, Parallelism TS V2, data-parallel algorithms, executors, and many more. It also extends the existing C++ Standard APIs to the distributed case (e.g. compute clusters) and for heterogeneous systems (e.g. GPUs).

    HPX seamlessly enables a new Asynchronous C++ Standard Programming Model that tends to improve the parallel efficiency of our applications and helps reducing complexities usually associated with parallelism and concurrency.

 

Inlining and Compiler Optimizations--Scott Wolchok

The complicated world of optimisations.

Inlining and Compiler Optimizations

by Scott Wolchok

From the article:

Why is inlining so important in C++? Clearly, it reduces function call overhead: if a function is inlined, there is no need to spend time setting up its arguments, jumping to it, creating a stack frame, and then undoing all that upon returning. More interestingly, though, inlining enables other compiler optimizations. In this article, I will show examples of constant propagation and loop-invariant code motion (LICM). Then, I will explain how inlining enables these optimizations to apply more widely and show an example of the consequences when that doesn’t happen...

Teresa Johnsons Meeting C++ 2020 Center Keynote: ThinLTO Whole Program Optimization

Taking a look at next weeks keynote by Teresa Johnson

Teresa Johnsons Center Keynote: ThinLTO Whole Program Optimization: Past, Present and Future

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Whole program optimization enables higher performance in C++ applications, because of the expanded scope for analysis and optimization. Traditionally, whole program optimization is not scalable in memory or time, and doesn't support effective incremental builds. ThinLTO (Thin Link Time Optimization) is a new compilation model that...

A look at next weeks Meeting C++ 2020 online conference

Looking at how next weeks Meeting C++ 2020 will be online

A look at next weeks Meeting C++ 2020 online conference

by Jens Weller

From the article:

First, Meeting C++ 2020 is an online conference, the planned onsite part is canceled. More about this in the last paragraph, as first, lets look whats happening next week!

The online part

Next weeks conference will consist of two tracks hosted in remo, one for talks and one for communication/networking/live video chat...

Jonathan Boccaras Meeting C++ 2020 opening keynote: meta-polymorphism

Some details for the opening keynote of Meeting C++ 2020 in two weeks!

Jonathan Boccaras Meeting C++ 2020 opening keynote: meta-polymorphism

by Jens Weller

From the article:

When you hear polymorphism you may think virtual functions, but this is just one speck of dust in the polymorphism universe.

HPX V1.5.1 released -- STE||AR Group

The STE||AR Group has released V1.5.1 of HPX -- A C++ Standard library for parallelism and concurrency.

HPX V1.5.1 Released

The newest version of HPX (V1.5.1) is now available for download! This is a relatively small bug-fix release that fixes some problems we discovered in the 1.5.0 release.

    HPX is a general purpose parallel C++ runtime system for applications of any scale. It implements all of the related facilities as defined by the C++ Standard. As of this writing, HPX provides the only widely available open-source implementation of the new C++17 parallel algorithms. Additionally, HPX implements functionalities proposed as part of the ongoing C++ standardization process, such as large parts of the features related parallelism and concurrency as specified by the upcoming C++20 Standard, the C++ Concurrency TS, Parallelism TS V2, data-parallel algorithms, executors, and many more. It also extends the existing C++ Standard APIs to the distributed case (e.g. compute clusters) and for heterogeneous systems (e.g. GPUs).

    HPX seamlessly enables a new Asynchronous C++ Standard Programming Model that tends to improve the parallel efficiency of our applications and helps reducing complexities usually associated with parallelism and concurrency.