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C++ User Group Sofia first year

A nice round up on the first year of the C++ User Group in Sofia:

C++ User Group Sofia first year

by Dimitar Mirchev

From the article

Some time in November 2015 we decided that it is a shame that we do not have a C++ User Group in Sofia, Bulgaria, and we decided that instead of waiting to just make it. This is a retro and an overview of what happened in our first year. I hope you find it helpful and inspirational.

Coding dojo in C++ Madrid | March 2017 @ Tuenti

Madrid's C++ meetup is organizing a Coding Dojo at Tuenti's HQ (calle Valverde, ID required).

Title: Coding "dojo" C++ moderno (C++11, C++14)

Organized by C++ Madrid

Several katas will be proposed by Manu Sánchez, Diego Rodríguez-Losada and Esteve Fernández which will be solved and discussed in common. Read more in the link above [in Spanish].

 

We've got a full house already!! Thanks for your interest.

Overload 137 is now available

ACCU’s Overload journal of February 2017 is out. It contains the following C++ related articles.

Overload 137 is now available

From the journal:

Mean Properties
Property based testing is all the rage. Russel Winder walks us through an example of properties an arithmetic mean function should have. by Russel Winder

The Importance of Back-of-Envelope Estimates
Guestimate questions make many people grumble. Sergey Ignatchenko reminds us why they matter. by Sergey Ignatchenko

Multiprocessing and Clusters in Python
Multiprocessing is possible in Python. Silas S. Brown shows us various ways. by Silas S. Brown

doctest – the Lightest C++ Unit Testing Framewor
C++ has many unit testing frameworks. Viktor Kirilov introduces doctest. by Viktor Kirilov

Correct Integer Operations with Minimal Runtime Penalties
Results of C++ integer operations are not guaranteed to be arithmetically correct. Robert Ramey introduces a library to enforce correct behaviour. by Robert Ramey

C++ User Group Meetings in February

The monthly overview on upcoming C++ User Group Meetings:

C++ User Group meetings in February

by Jens Weller

From the article:

The monthly overview on upcoming C++ User Group meetings. For February there are already 33 User Group meetings planned. Also in this month are emBO++ and C++ Russia!

There are 4 new C++ User Groups: Nashua, NH, Vienna (Qt), Austin (Mentoring & Study Group), Montréal.

ACCU 2017 Schedule has been published—ACCU conference committee

The schedule for the upcoming ACCU 2017 conference in Bristol, UK from 2017-04-26 to 2017-04-29 has been published.


ACCU 2017 Schedule

by ACCU conference committee

About the schedule

Again we have very strong C++ tracks this year!

Beside a closing keynote by Herb Sutter, where he wants to make a public announcement on an upcoming C++ development, there will be great C++ talks by members of the ISO C++ committee, other known C++ speakers and new faces to the C++ world.

Four full day tutorials take place the day before the conference, three with C++ content.

So don't forget to register

C++ User Group Meetings in January

The January listing of upcoming User Group meetings!

C++ User Group Meetings in January

by Jens Weller

From the article:

The new year has begun, and as I just returned the listing of the User Group Meetings is a bit late...

Yet still, 37 Meetings in January are listed, 7 of them in Austin, as there is a study group for Modern C++ now.

There are 3 new C++ User Groups: Nashua, NH, Vienna (Qt), Austin (Mentoring & Study Group).

C++Now 2017 Call for Submissions is Live

C++Now 2017 will be held in Aspen, May 15–20, 2017.

C++Now 2017 Call for Submissions

From the invitation:

C++Now builds upon the resounding success of previous BoostCon and C++Now conferences, We look forward to considering your proposals, among those from leading speakers from the entire C++ community, to make C++Now 2017 even better.

The C++Now Conference is dedicated to discussion and education about C++, an open and free language and standard.  Our Conference will focus on discussion and education about open source software usage and developments in the C++ developer and user community. To reflect the breadth of the C++ and Boost communities, the conference includes sessions aimed at three constituencies: C++ and Boost end-users, hard-core library and tool developers, and researchers pushing the boundaries of computing. The program fosters interaction and engagement within and across those groups, with an emphasis on discussion.

As a multi-paradigm language, C++ is a melting pot with the most compelling ideas from other programming communities blended in powerful ways. Historically, some of the most popular sessions at C++Now have highlighted these concepts, from DSLs to functional programming to transactional memory and more.  Bring your C#, Python, Ruby or Haskell influences to bear in an environment that will broaden their exposure.

Presentations at C++Now 2017 should generally focus on the now established C++11 and C++14 standards, the upcoming C++17 standard, and how those standards shape C++’s future. However, by no means is this intended to restrict the topics of proposals we hope to see. Any other topic related to C++, as described below, is suitable for submission.

This year’s window for submitting is shorter than normal. Submissions must be in by February 3rd, less than four weeks away.

A new way of blogging about C++—Yehonathan Sharvit

A very interesting plugin for our blogs:

A new way of blogging about C++

by Yehonathan Sharvit

From the article:

This blog post is about to show a new way of blogging about C++.

Look at a typical blog post about C++: The post usually presents a couple of code snippets. As I see it, there are two pains with code snippets:

  1. they contain the input and the output but not the actual evaluation of the input
  2. it’s impossible for the reader to modify the output...

My take on variant—Jonathan Müller

An interesting point of view and implementation of a variant in one article!

My take on variant

by Jonathan Müller

From the article:

C++17 is going to add std::variant. To quote the linked documentation, it is a “type-safe union”. A union is like a struct, but can only store one member at a time. This has many applications, but sadly it doesn’t mix well with non-trivial types, you have to call the destructor yourself etc. Furthermore, nothing prevents you from accessing a union member that isn’t active.

std::variant fixes that. It correctly calls the destructor when switching the active member, it prevents invalid access, etc. However, I’m not quite happy with it and I needed an implementation now. So I’ve decided to implement my own variant as part of my type_safe library.

It was a fun challenge and since my previous attempt was two years ago, I could improve it a lot. Let’s go through some of my design decisions.