community

Volunteer at Meeting C++ 2017

For the first time ever, you can participate in Meeting C++ as a volunteer, just like you could do with CppCon!

Volunteering at Meeting C++ 2017

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Something new, which didn't exist in the last 5 editions of the Meeting C++ conference. You are now able to become a volunteer at Meeting C++ 2017, like you can and always could do for CppCon.

Historically the staff for Meeting C++ first was from my own C++ User Group...

What’s new in clang-format 5

A good way to simplify your life:

What's new in clang-format 5

by Benoît Blanchon

From the article:

Clang 5 was released last week.
It's a good opportunity to talk about a not-enough-known tool: Clang-format.

Clang-format is part of the Clang project but can be used without the Clang compiler. It's an independent executable.

Clang-format is a code linter for C++. It takes a non-formatted code as input and produces a well-formatted code as output. The result is instantaneous.

Just::Thread Pro v2.5.0 released with coroutines support—Anthony Williams

A new version is out.

Just::Thread Pro v2.5.0 released with coroutines support

by Anthony Williams

From the article:

I am pleased to announce that Just::Thread Pro v2.5.0 has been released. This adds support for gcc 7, clang 4.0 and clang 5.0, but the big change with this version is the support for coroutines with Microsoft Visual Studio 2017, and clang 5.0 on ubuntu when used with libc++ 5.0.

CppCon 2016: What We’ve Learned From the C++ Community—Robert Irving & Jason Turner

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

What We've Learned From the C++ Community

by Robert Irving & Jason Turner

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

For over a year and a half Rob and Jason have been engaging with the speakers, library authors, bloggers and luminaries of the C++ community for their podcast, CppCast. In this talk they'll share the most interesting tools, insights and lessons they have learned from interviewing and interacting with the C++ community

Calls for Lightning Talks and Open Content

Who wants to participate?

Calls for Lightning Talks and Open Content

From the article:

Less that 30 days out from CppCon 2017, regular session and poster submissions are closed, both of the field trip tours are sold out, and most of our official hotel blocks are either closed or sold out.

But, even now, there are still conference opportunities. There is still over two weeks left of regular registration, we are still accepting class registrations, we have rooms available in some of our official hotel blocks, and it isn’t too late to attend sessions for free by signing up as a volunteer.

To day we are also opening up two ways to present at the conference.

Visual C++ for Linux Development with CMake—Marc Goodner

How to use Visual:

Visual C++ for Linux Development with CMake

by Marc Goodner

From the article:

In Visual Studio 2017 15.4 you can now target Linux from your CMake projects. This enables you to work on your existing code base that uses CMake as your build solution without having to convert it to a VS project. If your code base is cross-platform you can target both Windows and Linux from within Visual Studio.

This post will give an overview of the CMake support for Linux in Visual Studio. You can go here to learn more about CMake in Visual Studio generally.

CppCon 2016: My Little Optimizer: Undefined Behavior is Magic—Michael Spencer

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

My Little Optimizer: Undefined Behavior is Magic

by Michael Spencer

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Compiler exploitation of undefined behavior has been a topic of recent discussion in the programming community. This talk will explore the magic of Undefined Behavior, Covering how and why modern optimizers exploit undefined behavior in C++ programs.