intermediate

Searching and replacing in strings with boost

My series on building applications with Qt an boost continues:

Searching and replacing in strings with boost

by Jens Weller

From the article:

The next big milestone for my CMS is to actually generate HTML files, and I'm almost there. I'll reach it in the next two weeks, most code is written, just a little bit of refactoring is needed. This blog post is about searching and replacing in strings. As I started last week with implementing the functionality, that turns the data in my CMS into an HTML website.

There needs to be a lot of text transformed, in order to turn a shared structure like a cross page layout into a single, special HTML file, one of those transformations is, to replace the internal links with the correct links. A link to a different page in the same website cannot be represented as a text link, instead it is represented by a linkid, which corresponds to the Page it points to. This is to have still the correct link, if the page is renamed or moved...

Sometimes you get things wrong—Marshall Clow

What is the best thing to return?

Sometimes you get things wrong

by Marshall Clow

From the article:

A few years ago, Sean Parent challenged me to provide an implementation of Boyer-Moore searching in C++. I did that, first in boost and then, later as part of the proposed Library Fundamentals Technical Specification.

The idea here is that you have a searcher object, which encapsulates the actual searching. You construct it with the pattern that you want to search for, and then you call the searchers operator() with the corpus that you want to search, and it will return to you the start of the pattern in the corpus, if it exists, and the end of the corpus, if it does not (this is the same set of rules that std::search follows).

But this weekend I realized that this is not the right thing to return. The searcher (and std::search for that matter) should return a “range” (ok, a pair of iterators) denoting the beginning and end of the pattern in the corpus. (Yes, you can get the end of the pattern by incrementing the returned iterator by the length of the pattern, but that’s an O(N) operation if you only have forward iterators...

build2 — C++ Build Toolchain

build2 is an open source, cross-platform toolchain for building and packaging C++ code. It includes a build system, package manager, and repository web interface. There is also cppget.org, a public repository of open source C++ packages.

build2 — C++ Build Toolchain

From the announcement:

This is the first alpha release and currently it is more of a technology preview rather than anything that is ready for production. It has been tested on various Linux'es, Mac OS, and FreeBSD. There is no Windows support yet (but cross-compilation is supported).

Raw loops vs STL algorithms

A new post on the Meeting C++ blog, this time on <algorithm>

Raw loops vs. STL algorithms

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Since last week I am working on my CMS for static HTML pages again, and so the series about Building applications with Qt and boost continues. Today its about using STL algorithms, or how Sean Parent once said "no raw loops!". Now, I am not Sean Parent, and not event the implementers of the STL are perfect. Most code which I write is application code, which then powers Meeting C++. Also, I don't know all STL algorithms, and some times its just to tempting to write a little loop instead of searching the STL for the specific algorithm. Yesterday I had such a case.

Constructor Failures—Arne Mertz

Constructing or not constructing, that is the question.

Constructor Failures

by Arne Mertz

From the article:

Sometimes we fail to acquire a needed resource or responsibility during the construction of an object. Sometimes the construction of a subobject fails. How can we deal with an incompletely constructed object?

 

Using parallelism with boost::future

A new blog entry about parallelism and boost::future:

Using parallelism with boost::future

by Jens Weller

From the article:

... While I'm fine with that the application locks up kind of hard during writing a GB zip file (its only job), I'd like to be as fast as possible. Thats why I decided to parallelize the part of the application that reads the file paths via boost::filesystem...