experimental

GoingNative 65: ISO C++ @ Jacksonville Debriefing—Augustin Popa

Another is out!

GoingNative 65: ISO C++ @ Jacksonville Debriefing

by Augustin Popa

From the video:

We are back quickly after our last episode to go over the latest news from the ISO C++ Standards Committee meeting in Jacksonville, Florida! C++20 planning is well on its way now as Steve Carroll chats with Gabriel Dos Reis and Gor Nishanov about new progress with C++ Modules, Coroutines, and more!

Some coroutine-related papers accepted for a future version of the C++ standard (provides more context on the code shared in the video):

  • Symmetric control transfer
  • Parameter preview

Freestanding trip report: emBO++ and Jacksonville wg21 2018 experience-Ben Craig

A good experience.

Freestanding trip report: emBO++ and Jacksonville wg21 2018 experience

by Ben Craig

From the article:

I'm the author of P0829, Freestanding Proposal. The tl;dr of the paper is that it standardizes a subset of the library suitable for kernel and embedded programming. R0 of this poorly titled paper was reasonably well received in the Albuquerque 2017 meeting. I was encouraged to send it out to a wider audience... and so I did. One of the people that I sent it to was Odin Holmes, and that got me an invitation to emBO++, my first speech at a public conference. This conference was the week prior to the Jacksonville meeting, so I ended up flying from Bochum to Jacksonville without going home first...

Text Formatting at the ISO C++ standards meeting in Jacksonville—Victor Zverovich

A good library fro formatting in the standard, soon?

Text Formatting at the ISO C++ standards meeting in Jacksonville

by Victor Zverovich

From the article:

This week I attended the ISO C++ standards committee meeting to present the second revision of my paper P0645R1 Text Formatting, based on the {fmt} formatting library. The first revision was reviewed by Library Evolution Working Group (LEWG) in June 2017 in Toronto and there was a lot of feedback, particularly I’ve been asked to

  • investigate compile-time format string processing,
  • look at using or explain why not to use an output iterator,
  • use string_view,
  • allow pre-computation of output size,
  • add benchmarks.

It took me a while to address all the feedback, especially the first two items which required substantial API and implementation changes, so I had to skip the meeting in Albuquerque. However, this ultimately resulted in a much better API so I’m grateful to LEWG for the helpful guidance. Despite all the negative press covfefe “design by committee” sometimes works surprisingly well...

The “unsigned for value range” antipattern—Arthur O’Dwyer

What do you think?

The “unsigned for value range” antipattern

by Arthur O’Dwyer

From the article:

Background: Signed Integers Are (Not Yet) Two’s Complement
At the WG21 committee meeting which is currently underway in Jacksonville, JF Bastien will be presenting a proposal to make C++’s int data type wrap around on overflow. That is, where today the expression INT_MAX + 1 has undefined behavior, JF would like to see that expression formally defined to come out equal to INT_MIN...

optional in a possible C++20 future—Barry Revzin

Lots of proposals:

optional<T> in a possible C++20 future

by Barry Revzin

From the article:

C++17 gave us std::optional which is, in the words of a friend of mine, one of those really simple, ultra complex types — in the sense that it’s very easy to understand and use properly, even for relatively inexperienced programmers… but extremely difficult to implement correctly, even for experts (another such is std::pair). Today, it’s well over a thousand lines of code, most of which is critical to support even its most basic functionality. optional<T> is the simplest sum type, and it appears in lots of different languages (and even has special syntax in Swift) under various related names — Maybe, Option, etc. — but in the languages I’m even nominally familiar with, it’s about as simple to implement as it is to use.

But that’s the state of affairs today. What does tomorrow bring?

Introduction to the C++ Ranges Library—Jonathan Boccara

You can read it or watch it.

Introduction to the C++ Ranges Library

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

Do you know the ranges library in C++?

This video will show what limitations of the STL it solves, and how it can make C++ code more expressive.

Since some of you expressed that they liked text more than videos, I’ve included a transcript of the video. I’d be glad to know if you find this useful, and if you’d like to have a transcript for other videos...

Chaining Comparisons: Seeking Information from the Audience—Barry Revzin

A nice example of committee members reaching out to the community for data/input on proposed changes that could have a breaking impact.

Chaining Comparisons: Seeking Information from the Audience

by Barry Revzin

From the article:

At the last standards committee meeting in Albuquerque, the spaceship operator was adopted into the working draft for what will eventually be C++20. I’m already pretty excited about that. But one of the initial “optional” parts of Herb Sutter’s original spaceship proposal (which was dropped early) was to support chaining comparisons...

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (Nov 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency—Torvald Riegel

Discover how C++ evolves:

Red Hat at the ISO C++ Standards Meeting (November 2017): Parallelism and Concurrency

by Torvald Riegel

From the article:

Several Red Hat engineers attended the JTC1/SC22/WG21 C++ Standards Committee meetings in November 2017. This post focuses on the sessions of SG1, the study group on parallelism and concurrency. SG1 had a full schedule as usual, with Executors, Futures, and deferred reclamation mechanisms (e.g., RCU) being major discussion topics. We also started to track the state of proposals and topics we will need to discuss in a publicly accessible bug tracker...