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The Ultimate Question of Programming, Refactoring, and Everything

Yes, you've guessed correctly - the answer is "42". In this article you will find 42 recommendations about coding in C++ that can help a programmer avoid a lot of errors, save time and effort.

The Ultimate Question of Programming, Refactoring, and Everything

by Andrey Karpov

From the article:

The scope of my interests − the C/C++ language and the promotion of code analysis methodology. I have been Microsoft MVP in Visual C++ for 5 years. The main aim of my articles and work in general - is to make the code of programs safer and more secure. I'll be really glad if these recommendations help you write better code, and avoid typical errors. Those who write code standards for companies may also find some helpful information here.

Concepts without Concepts—Andrzej Krzemieński

Concetps are good, but how can we get them?

Concepts without Concepts

by Andrzej Krzemieński

From the article:

“Concept” can mean two things in the context of C++ generic libraries:

  1. Something informal: something we know about template parameters, and can tell to other human programmers, e.g. in documentation.
  2. A language feature.

This post is about concepts in the first sense. It claims that we had concepts for quite a while already, and shows how we can use them to make generic libraries easier to use...

Modern generic programming using the Tick and Fit libraries

Paul Fultz II talked at C++Now 2015 about generic programming.

Modern generic programming using the Tick and Fit libraries

By Paul Fultz II

From the abstract:

C++ templates provide a very powerful abstraction for generic programming. Even so, they still suffer from long and confusing compile errors and this puts an extra burden of complexity on library writers who want to provide flexibility in their interfaces. In this talk, we will first discuss the importance of concept-based type requirements in code in order to produce clear compile errors, and how the Tick library can be used to specify and check those type requirements.

Later, we will discuss how the Fit library can further enhance generic programming. The Fit library provides many abstractions over functions including a way to do sophisticated overloading in a simple and concise manner. We will discuss in this talk how we can leverage these abstractions with overloading to provide simple and flexible interfaces. We will also look at comparison of these solutions with the Concepts Lite proposal and Boost.ConceptCheck.

slides: here

C++17 and its Technical Specifications

The 2nd part of my series on proposals for C++17 deals with Technical Specifications:

C++17 and its Technical Specifications

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Part 2 of my series about the current proposals for C++17. This part is covering the Technical Specifications (TS), which are currently released. Some of them will make it into C++17. Those not making it into C++17...