Video & On-Demand

CppCon 2015 Writing Good C++14… By Default—Herb Sutter

Have you registered for CppCon 2016 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2015 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Writing Good C++14... By Default

by Herb Sutter

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Modern C++ is clean, safe, and fast. It continues to deliver better and simpler features than were previously available. How can we help most C++ programmers get the improved features by default, so that our code is better by upgrading to take full advantage of modern C++?

This talk continues from Bjarne Stroustrup’s Monday keynote to describe how the open C++ core guidelines project is the cornerstone of a broader effort to promote modern C++. Using the same cross-platform effort Stroustrup described, this talk shows how to enable programmers write production-quality C++ code that is, among other benefits, type-safe and memory-safe by default – free of most classes of type errors, bounds errors, and leak/dangling errors – and still exemplary, efficient, and fully modern C++.

Background reading: Bjarne Stroustrup’s 2005 “SELL” paper, “A rationale for semantically enhanced library languages," is important background for this talk.

CppCon 2015 Writing Good C++14—Bjarne Stroustrup

Have you registered for CppCon 2016 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2015 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Writing Good C++14

by Bjarne Stroustrup

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

How do we use C++14 to make our code better, rather than just different? How do we do so on a grand scale, rather than just for exceptional programmers? We need guidelines to help us progress from older styles, such as “C with Classes”, C, “pure OO”, etc. We need articulated rules to save us from each having to discover them for ourselves. Ideally, they should be machine-checkable, yet adjustable to serve specific needs.

In this talk, I describe a style of guidelines that can be deployed to help most C++ programmers. There could not be a single complete set of rules for everybody, but we are developing a set of rules for most C++ use. This core can be augmented with rules for specific application domains such as embedded systems and systems with stringent security requirements. The rules are prescriptive rather than merely sets of prohibitions, and about much more than code layout. I describe what the rules currently cover (e.g., interfaces, functions, resource management, and pointers). I describe tools and a few simple classes that can be used to support the guidelines.

The core guidelines and a guideline support library reference implementation will be open source projects freely available on all major platforms (initially, GCC, Clang, and Microsoft).

CppCast Episode 54: VS for Linux with Ankit Asthana

Episode 54 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Ankit Asthana to discuss new features for Visual Studio and VS Code. Including new support for Linux developers.

CppCast Episode 54: VS for Linux with Ankit Asthana

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Ankit Asthana is a program manager working in the Visual C++ Cross-Platform space. He is knowledgeable in cross-platform technologies, compilers (dynamic and static compilation, optimizer, code generation), distributed computing and server side development. He has in the past worked for IBM and Oracle Canada as a developer building Java 7 (hotspot) and telecommunication products. Ankit back in 2008 also published a book on C++ titled C++ for Beginners to Masters which sold over a few thousand copies.

CppCast Episode 52: Macchina.io with G√ľnter Obiltschnig

Episode 52 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Günter Obiltschnig to discuss the macchina.io library for IoT C++ development.

CppCast Episode 52: Macchina.io with Günter Obiltschnig

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Günter is the founder of the POCO C++ Libraries and macchina.io open source projects. He has been programming computers since age 12. In his career he has programmed everything from 8-bit home computers (C64, MSX) to IBM big iron systems (COBOL and JCL, VM/CMS and CICS), various Unix systems, OpenVMS, Windows NT in its various incarnations, the Mac (classic Mac OS and OS X), to embedded devices and iPhone/iPad. He has a diploma (MSc. equivalent) in Computer Science from the University of Linz, Austria.

His current main interests are embedded systems, cross-platform C++ development, JavaScript and, foremost, the Internet of Things. When not working, he spends time with his family or enjoys one of his hobbies — sailing, running, swimming, skiing, listening to or making music, and reading.