Video & On-Demand

CppCon 2023 Back to Basics: The Rule of Five in C++ -- Andre Kostur

cpp23-kostur.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Back to Basics: The Rule of Five in C++

by Andre Kostur

Summary of the talk:

Designing a class to behave correctly when copied and moved takes a lot of thought. The Core Guidelines provide guidance to streamline that work. In this talk we are going to look at the Core Guideline known as "the Rule of Five", how it came about, and is there anything better.

C++ Safety with Herb Sutter

The U.S. government released a report calling on the technical community to proactively reduce the attack surface area of software infrastructure. Herb tackles the concerns cast on C++ on memory safety.

C++ Safety with Herb Sutter


by Jordi Mon Companys in Software Engineering Daily

From the interview:

It's really, really important as native languages C and C++, not to have our heads in the sand and say, "Oh, well, we've been hearing this for years. All is well." No, it's not. We have work to do. But it's also important not to go to the other extreme, and think that, "Oh, if we just magically wave a wand and make all the world's software, suddenly convert overnight to memory-safe languages", which would be great if it can be done. It's not technically feasible. ut even if we could do that, we're not going to make most of the attacks go away.

CppCon 2023 Exceptionally Bad: The Misuse of Exceptions in C++ & How to Do Better -- Peter Muldoon

cpp23-muldoon.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Exceptionally Bad: The Misuse of Exceptions in C++ & How to Do Better

by Peter Muldoon

Summary of the talk:

Exceptions were originally heralded as a new modern way to handle errors. However the C++ community is split as to whether exceptions are useful or should be banned outright. It has not helped the pro-exception lobby that in their enthusiasm to embrace exceptions, a lot of code has been written that puts exceptions in a bad light.

In this talk, We will present the original intent/history of exceptions and a brief overview of how exception mechanics work and how they circumvent the usual stack return mechanism to set the stage. we will then examine the philosophy of using exceptions and then the many cases of exception misuse including resource management, retries, hierarchies, data passing and control flow to name but a few.

For each case, we will then suggest better ways to handle each specific situation. In many cases, exceptions are often dropped in favor of some other more appropriate paradigm.
Finally, we will introduce situations that can truly benefit from exceptions and what a model exception class might look like.

CppCon 2023 You Should Use Address Sanitizer -- Brody Holden

cpp23-holden.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Lightning Talk: You Should Use AddressSanitizer

by Brody Holden 

Summary of the talk:

This talk aims to get you, yes you, to use Address Sanitizer. ASan will detect various memory errors and is worth your time.

CppCon 2023 Delivering Safe C++ -- Bjarne Stroustrup

cpp23-deliveringsafec++.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Delivering Safe C++

by Bjarne Stroustrup

Summary of the talk:

Type safety was one of the key initial C++ design ideals. We have evolved C++ to the point where we can write C++ with no violations of the type system, no resource leaks, no memory corruption, no garbage collector, no limitation of expressiveness or performance degradation compared to well-written modern C++.

We face three major challenges: To define what “safe” means in the context of various C++ uses, to guarantee such safety where guarantees are needed, and to get developers to write such verified safe code.

I outline an approach based on safety profiles to address these challenges, describe an approach to eliminate dangling pointers, and suggest how to eliminate all dangling pointers and all range errors. My aim for key applications is verified type-and-resource-safe C++. An emphasis is on minimizing costly run-time checks through the use of abstractions. I see the current emphasis on safety as an opportunity to complete one aspect of C++’s fundamental aims in real-world code.

 

CppCon 2023 Cooperative C++ Evolution - Toward a Typescript for C++ -- Herb Sutter

suttercpp23.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Plenary: Cooperative C++ Evolution - Toward a Typescript for C++

by Herb Sutter

Summary of the talk:

C++23 is done. But C++ is not! In this talk I’ll give my personal perspectives on:

  • C++’s ongoing and very active evolution;
  • The latest progress updates on my cppfront experimental compiler, and what I’ve learned about modern ISO C++20 and C++23 in the experiment (https://github.com/hsutter/cppfront);
  • Why compatibility (and what kind, and how much) is essential; and
  • Why we should aim to keep bringing C++ forward successfully by cooperating and being part of C++’s ongoing true evolution via WG 21, even though that’s more work than pursuing a new fresh-but-competing evolutionary path.

CppCon 2023 ClangFormat Is Not It -- Anastasia Kazakova

kazakovacpp2.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Lightning Talk: ClangFormat Is Not It

by Anastasia Kazakova

Summary of the talk:

Sometimes things are not what we think of them. But we keep using them based on our perception. ClangFormat is a widely used tool by the C++ community. Join me to explore the typical delusions around it.

CppCon 2023 C++ Modules: Getting Started Today -- Andreas Weis

weiscpp23.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

C++ Modules: Getting Started Today

by Andreas Weis

Summary of the talk:

Modules have been one of the most highly anticipated features of C++20. Unfortunately, it was also the language feature that took the longest to become widely available for developers to use. This year, for the first time, we see broad support for the feature in all major compilers and mainstream build system support through CMake. The goal of this talk is to provide you with all the basic knowledge to allow you getting started with C++20 modules today.

We will take a look at how modules change the build process and why it took so long to implement them. We will take a tour of the essentials of the named modules mechanism and explore the new best practices for physical code structure in a modules-based code base, including how to set up a build with CMake. And last but not least, we will discuss different options for interacting with existing header-based code.

The talk will focus above all else on practicality: We will only be covering features that are widely available for use today with the latest compilers and build tools. We will give special attention to the areas where the design practices for modules differ from the familiar header-based approach and address common misconceptions and pitfalls that are typical among developers first encountering the feature. No prior knowledge of modules is required.

CppCon 2023 Higher-Order Template Metaprogramming with C++23 -- Ed Catmur

catmurcpp23.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

Lightning Talk: Higher-Order Template Metaprogramming with C++23

by Ed Catmur

Summary of the talk:

C++20's Concepts transformed metaprogramming, but they can still be inflexible and are not readily composable. I demonstrate a few simple yet powerful techniques to allow building concepts from type traits, type transformations and even other concepts.

CppCon 2023 File I/O for Game Developers: Past, Present, and Future with C++ -- Guy Davidson

davisoncpp23.pngRegistration is now open for CppCon 2024! The conference starts on September 15 and will be held in person in Aurora, CO. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from last year's conference. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2024!

File I/O for Game Developers: Past, Present, and Future with C++

by Guy Davidson

Summary of the talk:

If you have played a game on a computer in the last few decades, you will most likely have encountered a loading screen. This is used to advertise to the player that, among other things, data is being loaded from a storage device into the game. But why does this exist, why does it take so long, and how can we improve matters for the player?

In this talk we will discover the history of games and their development environments, the relationship between address space, RAM and storage hardware, how C++ abstracts file I/O and why it might not be the best fit for game developers, how a 64-bit address space changes everything, how #embed will change everything, and how C++29 (yes, 29) may upset the applecart yet again.

Although this talk is aimed at game developers who are often Windows programmers, it is relevant to anyone who has to read large amounts of data from local storage. Expect tales of woe, discovery and jubilation as I describe every surprising little thing I've learned about file I/O over the past 40 years and how C++ is heading for a great future in games.