Video & On-Demand

CppCon 2014 cppreference.com: documenting C++ one edit at a time—Nate Kohl

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

cppreference.com: documenting C++ one edit at a time

by Nate Kohl

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

How do you convert hundreds of pages of C++ standardese into a resource that is accessible to software engineers around the world? This talk will describe the process of building a community-run website that documents all of the nooks and dark corners of the C++ programming language. I'll look back at the history of how C++ was defined, cover the current state of documentation, examine the pros and cons of running a fairly high-profile publicly-editable wiki, and try to guess at what the future holds.

CppCast Episode 18: POCO Project with Aleksandar Fabijanic

Episode 18 of CppCast the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers.In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Aleksandar Fabijanic to discuss the C++ Portable Components project.

CppCast Episode 18: POCO Project with Aleksandar Fabijanic

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Alex holds two undergraduate degrees in mechanical engineering from Faculty of Engineering (University of Rijeka, Croatia) and the master's degree in software engineering from Citadel Graduate College in Charleston, South Carolina. Alex is a IEEE Computer Society Certified Software Development Professional. He's been seriously programming computers since 1992 and developing steel manufacturing automation and process control software using C and C++ since 1998. He used to compete in rowing on World Championship/Olympic Games level. Nowadays, he spends his free time reading, exercising and occasionally woodworking.

C++ on the Web: ponies for developers without pwn’ing users—JF Bastien

Another video coming from NDC:

C++ on the Web: ponies for developers without pwn’ing users

by JF Bastien

What you will find in the video:

Delivering a program through a web browser really shouldn't force it to be slower than executing it directly on your OS. Similarly, doing so shouldn't force you to rewrite programs that target venerable, cornerstone native programming APIs—modern C++ STL, OpenGL, files and processes—nor should it forbid you from taking advantage of C++’s concurrency and parallelism in order to meet programming challenges like resource-constrained devices, battery-starved devices, and high performance code. Oh, and the browser should keep users secure from malicious sites.
In this presentation we'll showcase some resource-intensive applications that have been compiled for the PNaCl platform and, unsurprisingly, worked just like native code. These include a full development environment, complete with LLVM and your favorite build system and editor, all in an architecture- and OS-agnostic packaging. Then, we'll describe how we deliver native code on the web securely, so developers get their C++ ponies and users don’t get pwn’d. We’ll also touch on the fuzzing, code randomization and sandboxing that keep 1B+ users safe.

CppCon 2014 Common-sense acceleration of your MLOC build—Matt Hargett

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Common-sense acceleration of your MLOC build

Matt Hargett

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

In this talk, I lay out detailed examples of steps I took to dramatically improve build times, and ultimately developer productivity, in very large, legacy C/C++ codebases. Is it worth the extra money for SSD or a 15K RPM SAS? How do I make ccache and distcc work together? How do I profile-optimize my toolchain? What network topology issues come into play? These questions, and more, are addressed in detail so you can immediately apply what you've learned to shorten the timeline between when you make a change to your code and when you see it in action.

Functional C++—Kevlin Henney

See the talk Kevlin Henney gave at the NDC this june:

Functional C++

by Kevlin Henney

What you will find in the video:

Functional C++? As opposed to what - dysfunctional? Well, kind of, yeah. Sure, in C++ the principal unit of composition is called a function, but that doesn't mean it's a functional language. And the idea of restricting mutability of state gets a nod with const, but it's a nod not a hug. And the STL shows influences of functional programming, although it falls short of being compositional. And, yes, sure, C++11 has lambdas, but then again, these days, who doesn't? Lambda calculus was invented in the 1930s.
This talk looks at how to express functional programming ideas in (post)modern C++ in a way that can be considered idiomatic to C++, rather than trying to use the power of overloading and metaprogramming to pretend C++ is Haskell or Lisp. In short, immutability beyond const and into shared and persistent data structures, concurrency beyond threading and locks, and thinking about functions as transformations and units of composition rather than actions.

CppCon 2014 Emscripten and asm.js: C++‘s role in the modern web—Alon Zakai

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Emscripten and asm.js: C++'s role in the modern web

by Alon Zakai

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

All major web browsers are written in C++, but C++ is starting to fill an important role in web *content* as well: while JavaScript is the only standards-compliant language available to websites, compiling other languages to JavaScript has been shown to be practical and effective. This talk will explain how Emscripten, an LLVM-based open source compiler from C++ to JavaScript, lets you run a C++ codebase on the web at near-native speed. To achieve that level of performance, Emscripten emits asm.js, a strict subset of JavaScript that is easy for JavaScript engines to optimize, and was designed specifically as a compilation target for languages like C and C++. We'll also discuss some of the more challenging aspects of compiling C++ to JavaScript, stemming from the C++ language itself, libraries and toolchains, and some thoughts on possible solutions.

CppCon 2014 What the committee did next!—Alisdair Meredith

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

What the committee did next!

by Alisdair Meredith

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Now that C++14 is done, what is the standard committee working on next?

After inking 8 years to produce the C++11 standard (arguably 13) there was a feeling we should be able to produce new work faster, more incrementally. With the renewed interest in C++, we have more participation on the committee, and have looked to harness that enthusiasm in new ways. In the last 3 years we have spun up at least a dozen new study groups, and have 8 or mode Technical Specifications in various stages of development that we hope to ship over the next 12-24 months. So what are all these new groups and specifications about? Come to this session and get a vision of where C++ is headed in the immediate and short-term future.

CppCast Episode 17: Exercism.io and Refactoring with Richard Thomson

Episode 17 of CppCast the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Richard Thomson to discuss exercism.io and C++ refactoring tools

CppCast Episode 17: Exercism.io and Refactoring with Richard Thomson

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Richard Thomson is a passionate software craftsman. He has been writing C programs since 1980, C++ programs since 1993 and practicing test-driven development since 2006. For 10 years, Richard was a Microsoft MVP for Direct3D, Microsoft's native C++ API for 3D graphics. His book on Direct3D is available as a free download. Prior to that, Richard was a technical reviewer of the OpenGL 1.0 specification. He is the director of the Computer Graphics Museum in Salt Lake City, Utah and currently works at DAZ 3D writing 3D modeling software in C++. Recently, Richard has added the C++ language track to exercism.io and has been working on adding refactoring tools to the clang tool suite.

CppCon 2014 Parallelizing the Standard Algorithms Library—Jared Hoberock

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Parallelizing the Standard Algorithms Library

by Jared Hoberock

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Until recently, C++ programmers building parallel programs found little support for parallelism in the standard toolbox. That's changing with the technical specification on Extensions for Parallelism in C++. This talk will explore how programmers can build portable parallel programs from high-level parallel algorithms which can execute on CPU threads, vector units, and even GPUs.

CppCon 2014 The Implementation of Value Types—Lawrence Crowl

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

The Implementation of Value Types

by Lawrence Crowl

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Predefined value types are central to C++ efficiency and robustness. More importantly, C++ provides mechanisms that enable programmers to create high-quality value types, programmers are not limited to the small predefined value types. However, implementing a high-quality type requires attention to several problems, among them portability, representation, efficient copying, efficient parameters, aliasing, constant initialization, and constant expressions. We present the issues and several approaches to implementing high-quality value types.