Video & On-Demand

CppCon 2014 Microsoft w/ C++ to Deliver Office Across Different Platforms, Part IIā€”Zaika Antoun

Have you registered for CppCon 2015 in September? Don’t delay – Early Bird registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Microsoft w/ C++ to Deliver Office Across Different Platforms, Part II

by Zaika Antoun

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

What does it take to target multiple major mobile devices (as well as traditional environments) with portable, efficient, single-source code? This talk demonstrates architectures, techniques, and lessons learned rooted in actual experience with using C++ to deliver several major cross-platform projects across iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac: Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote) and the SQL Server PowerBI. Each presents a different case study: For example, Office already used C++, whereas PowerBI was originally written in Silverlight and then rewritten in C++; Office is a set of user-facing apps, whereas PowerBI is a system component. Although some of these are demanding first-tier “Cadillac” applications, we expect this experience to be a model for the future as more and more apps fall into this category and use C++ to target many popular platforms from (mostly) a single source base. This talk will cover the following key topics and tradeoffs: Rich vs. reach, including access to latest OS features (e.g., iOS 8 additions) and hardware features (e.g., vector units, GPUs). Consistency of functionality. Client code vs. server/service web code. Sharing vs. quality, including dialing appropriately between more shared code and high quality code. Drawing the line between the bulk of C++ code and interfacing with non-C++ for UX and PALs (platform adaptation/abstraction layers) for target-specific user interface and system services. Architecting PALs, including why “mini-PALs” rather than an “über-PAL.” Forces “doing the right thing” and good architecture with composable components. How C++ enables things not feasible using other technologies. Velocity and enabling faster cross-platform development and deployment. Cost of maintenance, including time, size, and complexity (both breadth and depth). And, last but not least, developing in a single modern C++ source base built with different evolving C++ compilers, including VC++ and Clang/LLVM.

CppCast Episode 13: Testdriven C++ using Catch with Phil Nash

Episode 13 of CppCast the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Phil Nash to talk about C++ Unit Testing with Catch.

CppCast Episode 13: Testdriven C++ using Catch with Phil Nash

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Phil is a semi-independent software developer, coach and consultant - working in as diverse fields as finance, agile coaching and iOS development. A long time C++ developer he also has his feet in C#, F#, Objective-C and Swift - as well as dabbling in other languages. He is the author of several open source projects - most notably Catch: a C++-native test framework.

CppCon 2014 Microsoft w/ C++ to Deliver Office Across Different Platforms, Part I—Zaika Antoun

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Microsoft w/ C++ to Deliver Office Across Different Platforms, Part I

by Zaika Antoun

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

What does it take to target multiple major mobile devices (as well as traditional environments) with portable, efficient, single-source code? This talk demonstrates architectures, techniques, and lessons learned rooted in actual experience with using C++ to deliver several major cross-platform projects across iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac: Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote) and the SQL Server PowerBI. Each presents a different case study: For example, Office already used C++, whereas PowerBI was originally written in Silverlight and then rewritten in C++; Office is a set of user-facing apps, whereas PowerBI is a system component. Although some of these are demanding first-tier “Cadillac” applications, we expect this experience to be a model for the future as more and more apps fall into this category and use C++ to target many popular platforms from (mostly) a single source base. This talk will cover the following key topics and tradeoffs: Rich vs. reach, including access to latest OS features (e.g., iOS 8 additions) and hardware features (e.g., vector units, GPUs). Consistency of functionality. Client code vs. server/service web code. Sharing vs. quality, including dialing appropriately between more shared code and high quality code. Drawing the line between the bulk of C++ code and interfacing with non-C++ for UX and PALs (platform adaptation/abstraction layers) for target-specific user interface and system services. Architecting PALs, including why “mini-PALs” rather than an “über-PAL.” Forces “doing the right thing” and good architecture with composable components. How C++ enables things not feasible using other technologies. Velocity and enabling faster cross-platform development and deployment. Cost of maintenance, including time, size, and complexity (both breadth and depth). And, last but not least, developing in a single modern C++ source base built with different evolving C++ compilers, including VC++ and Clang/LLVM.

CppCon 2014 UI prototyping and development for multiple devices in C++—John “JT” Thomas

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

UI prototyping and development for multiple devices in C++

by John "JT" Thomas

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Using C++ for multi-device user interface and app development should be pretty straightforward. However, since the Standard C++ Language and Library specification does not specify a user interface library, it's actually quite challenging given that the two leading mobile platforms provide non-C++ User Interface APIs. Even more challenging is the new world of mobile devices and the myriad form factors, layouts, resolutions, sensors, and services that an application developer has to deal with. Plus, the deployment model for remote devices makes testing UI changes slower due to the increased build and turnaround time. This session will describe how C++ can be used effectively for multi-device UI development and also deliver a rapid prototyping experience to minimize the deployment time to the device for testing.

STL Concepts and Ranges—Eric Niebler

Here is a video of Eric Niebler presenting a future C++:

STL Concepts and Ranges

by Eric Niebler

From the video:

With concepts and ranges coming, big changes are in store for the Standard Library and for the style of idiomatic C++. The effort to redefine the Standard Library is picking up pace. Come hear about one potential future from one of the key people driving the change. In this talk, Eric works through a tricky example and shows an elegant solution rooted both in yesterday's STL and tomorrow's. He will speak briefly about where we are in the process to reinvent and reinvigorate the Standard Library.

CppCon 2014 Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part II—Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part II

by Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Network programming in C++ frequently requires programmers to find a way to express C++ objects as a sequence of bytes which can be transmitted and reconstructed on another network endpoint. In the case of simpler objects (such as most PODs), object serialization is trivial to perform.

For more complex C++ constructs (polymorphic objects, etc), the approach to serialization is more challenging. This talk will discuss how two powerful Boost libraries, Asio and Serialization, can be used to craft C++ networking code that can handle a vast array of uses cases. A prototype for a message passing framework will be developed throughout the talk.

Programmers familiar with or interested in network programming (but perhaps unfamiliar with Boost.Asio, Boost.Serialization or both) are the intended audience. No prior knowledge of Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization will be assumed, and alternatives to both libraries will be discussed.

CppCast Episode 12: Modern C++ for the Windows Runtime with Kenny Kerr

Episode 12 of CppCast the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Kenny Kerr to talk about Modern C++ for the Windows Runtime. Kenny also shares his thoughts on printf and tells us about his new Pluralsight course.

CppCast Episode 12: Modern C++ for the Windows Runtime with Kenny Kerr

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Kenny Kerr is a computer programmer and recognized expert in Windows operating system development and programming languages. Kenny has published numerous articles about the Windows operating system, network security, and C++ for MSDN Magazine as well as other publications. Microsoft has recognized Kenny’s expertise in network and operating system security with the Microsoft MVP Award for security. He has also held the Microsoft MVP Award since 2007 for his contributions to the C++ development community.

CppCon 2014 Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part I—Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization, Part I

by Bryce Adelstein-Lelbach

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Network programming in C++ frequently requires programmers to find a way to express C++ objects as a sequence of bytes which can be transmitted and reconstructed on another network endpoint. In the case of simpler objects (such as most PODs), object serialization is trivial to perform.

For more complex C++ constructs (polymorphic objects, etc), the approach to serialization is more challenging. This talk will discuss how two powerful Boost libraries, Asio and Serialization, can be used to craft C++ networking code that can handle a vast array of uses cases. A prototype for a message passing framework will be developed throughout the talk.

Programmers familiar with or interested in network programming (but perhaps unfamiliar with Boost.Asio, Boost.Serialization or both) are the intended audience. No prior knowledge of Boost.Asio and Boost.Serialization will be assumed, and alternatives to both libraries will be discussed.

CppCon 2014 Sanitize your C++ code—Kostya Serebryany

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Sanitize your C++ code

by Kostya Serebryany

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

"Sanitizers" is a family of dynamic testing tools built into C++ compilers (Clang and GCC):
AddressSanitizer finds memory errors, such as use-after-free, buffer overflows, and leaks;
ThreadSanitizer finds data races, deadlocks, and other threading bugs;
MemorySanitizer finds uses of uninitialized memory;
UndefinedBehaviorSanitizer finds other kinds of undefined behavior, such as use of incorrect dynamic type, shift by illegal amount and many others.
You will learn how these tools work, how to use them on small programs and how we deploy them in large projects.

CppCon 2014 Large-Scale Refactoring @ Google—Hyrum Wright

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Large-Scale Refactoring @ Google

by Hyrum Wright

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Many organizations have significant investments in a large existing C++ codebase, and Google is no exception. Our code is intended to survive for decades, but continue to track new language standards as they emerge. To do so, we have developed tools and techniques which provide the ability to automatically refactor code to use new APIs as they become available.

In this talk, I'll discuss some of the reasons for doing migrations that impact hundreds of thousands of files, and how we do them at Google, using tools such as ClangMR. I'll give examples, such as our recent migration to the standardized std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr types and lessons we've learned from these experiences. Finally, I'll point out pitfalls others may face in doing similar work, and suggest ways that they can be avoided.