efficiency

C++ Weekly Episode 75: Why You Cannot Move From Const—Jason Turner

Episode 75 of C++ Weekly.

Why You Cannot Move From Const

by Jason Turner

About the show:

You may have noticed that it's possible to use std::move with a const object, but have you stopped to consider what it does? What you think is a move is silently reverting to a copy without your knowing. In this episode Jason explains what is happening and why.

CppCon 2016: Iterator Haiku—Casey Carter

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Iterator Haiku

by Casey Carter

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Iterator Haiku: How five iterator categories blossomed into seven, and Sentinels trimmed them back to five again. Recently proposed changes to the ranges TS distill its seven iterator categories back to five without sacrificing any expressive power. Removing operations that are extraneous in the Sentinel world eliminates a potential source of programming errors.

CppCon 2016: Constant Fun—Dietmar Kühl

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Constant Fun

by Dietmar Kühl

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

This presentation discusses why it is useful to move some of the processing to compile time and shows some applications of doing so. In particular it shows how to create associative containers created at compile time and what is needed from the types involved to make it possible. The presentation also does some analysis to estimate the costs in terms for compile-time and object file size.

Specifically, the presentation discusses:
- implications of static and dynamic initialization – the C++ language rules for implementing constexpr functions and classes supporting constexpr objects.
- differences in error handling with constant expressions.
- sorting sequences at compile time and the needed infrastructure – creating constant associative containers with compile-time and run-time look-up.

Yielding Generators—Kirit Sælensminde

The series continue!

Yielding Generators

by Kirit Sælensminde

From the article:

We've seen how the promise_type together with the coroutine return type handles the interactions between the caller and the coroutine itself.

Our target is to be able to do something pretty simple:

generator count() {
    std::cout << "Going to yield 1" << std::endl;
    co_yield 1;
    std::cout << "Going to yield 2" << std::endl;
    co_yield 2;
    std::cout << "Going to yield 3" << std::endl;
    co_yield 3;
    std::cout << "count() is done" << std::endl;
}

CppCon 2016: C++ Coroutines: Under the covers—Gor Nishanov

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

C++ Coroutines: Under the covers

by Gor Nishanov

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Coroutines feel like magic. Functions that can suspend and resume in the middle of the execution without blocking a thread! We will look under the covers to see what transformations compilers perform on coroutines, what happens when a coroutine is started, suspended, resumed or cancelled. We will look at optimizations that can make a coroutine disappear into thin air.

Future Ruminations—Sean Parent

This post is a lengthy answer to a question from Alisdair Meredith via Twitter

Future Ruminations

by Sean Parent

From the article:

The question is regarding the numerous proposals for a better future class template for C++, including the proposal from Felix Petriconi, David Sankel, and myself.

It is a valid question for any endeavor. To answer it, we need to define what we mean by a future so we can place bounds on the solution. We also need to understand the problems that a future is trying to solve, so we can determine if a future is, in fact, a useful construct for solving those problems.

The proposal started with me trying to solve a fairly concrete problem; how to take a large, heavily threaded application, and make it run in a single threaded environment (specifically, compiled to asm.js with the Emscripten compiler) but also be able to scale to devices with many cores. I found the current standard and boost implementation of futures to be lacking. I open sourced my work on a better solution, and discussed this in my Better Code: Concurrency talk. Felix heard my CppCast interview on the topic, and became the primary contributor to the project.

Playing with C++ Coroutines—Sumant Tambe

An old presentation about coroutines:

Playing with C++ Coroutines

by Sumant Tambe

From the article:

While looking for some old photos, I stumbled upon my own presentation on C++ coroutines, which I never posted online to a broader audience. I presented this material in SF Bay ACCU meetup and at the DC Polyglot meetup in early 2016! Yeah, it's been a while. It's based on much longer blogpost about Asynchronous RPC using modern C++. So without further ado...

A more realistic coroutine—Kirit Sælensminde

What’s the point of coroutines?

A more realistic coroutine

by Kirit Sælensminde

From the article:

Having gotten something working, we still have a small problem. We have a coroutine that we can start, and we can choose when to suspend it, but we can't yet resume it.

The coroutines TS describes a class std::experimental::coroutine_handle which is our interface to the coroutine itself. It's a template which is supposed to be told the promise_type we're using...

5 years of Meeting C++

Meeting C++ exists now for 5 years, lets celebrate on the blog:

5 years of Meeting C++

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Just a little bit more then 5 years ago, Meeting C++ went public. Since then, it has been a wild ride and huge success. Today, Meeting C++ reaches over 50k in social media, the conference it self has grown from 150 to 600 in its 5 editions...

My first coroutine—Kirit Sælensminde

What's the point of coroutines?

My first coroutine

by Kirit Sælensminde

From the article:

There are more and more examples coming out of how to convert things like the use of futures into coroutines, and you may be forgiven for thinking that there is also some magic that happens in boost::future or std::future that lets this work, but that's not the case.

In C++ a coroutine is any function that contains one of the coroutine keywords in its body, that is any of co_return, co_yield or co_await.

What we're going to do is to write a very basic mechanism that allows us to use co_return to return a value from a coroutine. Coroutines are really a generalisation of a function call, and what this is going to allow us to do is to treat a coroutine as a function call. If we can't do this then we don't stand much chance of doing anything more interesting with them, but it will give us a good starter on how the machinery works...