efficiency

CppCast Episode 180: Semantic Merge for C++ code, Plastic SCM and more on version control

Episode 180 of CppCast the first podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Pablo Santos from Códice Software the company that develops a merge tool that parses and merges even refactored C++ code:

CppCast Episode 180: Semantic Merge for C++ code, Plastic SCM and more on version control

About the interviewee:

Prior to entering start-up mode to launch Plastic SCM back in 2005, Pablo worked as R&D engineer in fleet control software development (GMV, Spain) and later digital television software stack (Sony, Belgium). Then he moved to a project management position (GCC, Spain) leading the evolution of an ERP software package for industrial companies. During these years he became an expert in version control and software configuration management working as a consultant and participating in several events as a speaker. Pablo founded Codice SoftwaLogo-semantic-vertical-negative.pngre in 2005 and since then is focused on his role as chief engineer designing and developing Plastic SCM and SemanticMerge among other SCM products.

Using multi-stage containers for C++ development—Marc Goodner

An interesting method.

Using multi-stage containers for C++ development

by Marc Goodner

From the article:

Containers are a great tool for configuring reproducible build environments. It’s fairly easy to find Dockerfiles that provide various C++ environments. Unfortunately, it is hard to find guidance on how to use newer techniques like multi-stage builds. This post will show you how you can leverage the capabilities of multi-stage containers for your C++ development. This is relevant to anyone doing C++ development regardless what tools you are using...

AI-Assisted Code Completion Suggestions Come to C++ via IntelliCode—Nick Uhlenhuth

Impressive.

AI-Assisted Code Completion Suggestions Come to C++ via IntelliCode

by Nick Uhlenhuth

From the article:

After reading and writing enough code, you begin to notice certain usage patterns. For example, if a stream is open, it will eventually be closed. More interestingly, if a string is used in the context of an if-statement, it will often be to check if the string is empty or if it has a certain size. You begin to identify and use these coding patterns over time, but what if Visual Studio already knew these common patterns and could suggest them to you as you code? That’s exactly what IntelliCode does...