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CppCon 2018 Program Available

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CppCon 2018 Program Available

From the article:

The program for CppCon 2018 is now live!

We’ll have over 100 regular sessions delivered by the best C++ presenters in the industry, many returning from previous years as well as some exciting new voices. We’ll have six or seven concurrent tracks full of sessions containing C++ best practices and what you need to know about C++17 and even what is planned for C++20...

CppCon 2017: CNL: A Compositional Numeric Library—John McFarlane

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

CNL: A Compositional Numeric Library

by John McFarlane

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

CNL is a numerics library born out of efforts to standardize fixed-point arithmetic.
It provides number types which increase precision, enforce correctness and maintain efficiency.
And by designing these types with composability in mind, the library aims to do for integers what the STL does for pointers.

This introductory talk will show potential users how they can benefit from using CNL in a wide variety of applications. Firstly, the individual components will be illustrated using straightforward examples. Then we'll see how these components slot together to produce powerful new types. Finally I'll detail the steps necessary to adapt existing types to work within the CNL framework.

Along the way, I hope to share some of the insights I've gained while learning about literal types including: why you shouldn't mess with `int` if you want zero-cost abstractions; how C++ is getting better at supporting new number types and my hopes for the forthcoming Numeric TS.

CLion 2018.2 released: clangd, new project models, sanitizers, and more–JetBrains

CLion is becoming a more mature C/C++ IDE with the new release!

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CLion 2018.2 released: clangd, Gradle and compilation database projects, Google Sanitizers, and database support

by Anastasia Kazakova

From the article:

In this release, we’ve done our best to deliver some very important new capabilities for both groups - our current customers and those still waiting for some critical functionality to be added before they adopt CLion. On the one hand, CLion comes with an experimental complementary clangd-base language engine and a set of important performance improvements. On the other, it introduces support for several new project models (like Gradle C++ and compilation database format), which may open the door to a public project model API in the future.

Database tools and SQL support join CLion 2018.2 as a bundled plugin, which adds DataGrip’s functionality to the IDE. This release also introduces support for Google Sanitizers.

CppCon 2017: Building C++ Modules—Boris Kolpackov

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Building C++ Modules

by Boris Kolpackov

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

C++ Modules TS is now implemented (to various degrees) by GCC, Clang, and MSVC. The aim of this talk is to provide practical information on the mechanics of creating and consuming modules with these compilers. It is based on our experience adding modules support to the build2 toolchain and then modularizing some of its components.

We start with a brief introduction to C++ modules, why we need them, and how they relate to other physical design mechanisms, namely headers, namespaces, and libraries.

Next we explore the kind of integration modules will require from a C++ build system. Specifically, when and where a module binary interface is built? How can a build system discover which modules are needed? What are the implications for parallel and distributed builds? Can we finally get rid of the preprocessor? And what happens to header-only libraries in this brave new modularized world?

With a firm understanding of the implications C++ modules have on the build process, we can try to answer some of the module design questions: What is an appropriate module granularity? Should we have separate module interface and implementation units? Can we have a dual header/module interface for legacy support? Are module-only libraries to become all the rage?

CppCon 2017: Programming with C++ Constraints: Background, Utility, and Gotchas—Walter E. Brown

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Programming with C++ Constraints: Background, Utility, and Gotchas

by Walter E. Brown

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Compile-time constraints will likely soon become part of our routine C++ programming vocabulary. Why? Such constraints are induced by new core language features (requires-clauses and requires-expressions) that are on the horizon for C++. What are these all about?

Almost every function imposes requirements on its users; violating those requirements typically leads to incorrect programs. Historically, such requirements had to be expressed in comments or other documentation, as there was little machinery to express them in code. Soon we will be able to express more requirements in code, thus allowing compilers to detect and address more violations.

This talk aims to prepare both new and veteran C++ programmers with the necessary background, tutorial information, and advice to exploit this powerful new supplement to function declarations. A case study, illustrating an unexpected gotcha, will conclude the presentation.

CppCon 2017: Undefined Behaviour is awesome!—Piotr Padlewski

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Undefined Behaviour is awesome!

by Piotr Padlewski

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Undefined behavior (UB) is one of the features of C++ that is both loved and hated. Every C++ developer cares about performance, which is why it is very important to understand what the compiler can optimize and what are the language guarantees. Many times programmers are too optimistic about what the compiler can optimize, or they waste time optimizing code by hand.

In this talk you will learn:
- what is the “as-if” rule
- why compilers know less than the programmer — the main problem with Translation Units
- why compilers optimize based on UB, but don't warn about it
- why Undefined Behavior can transcend time, removing your whole code without running 88mph
- why having a more constrained language is better — optimizations that you can’t do in C

CppCon 2017: Seventeenification: Porting sqlpp11 to C++17—Roland Bock

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Seventeenification: Porting sqlpp11 to C++17

by Roland Bock

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

The ink on C++17 has merely dried, but the major compilers support most features already. It's high time for a reality check!

This talk is a report about the ongoing effort of porting sqlpp11 to C++17. I'll show real-world usage of the following features:

Core:
inline variables
auto non-type template parameters
[[nodiscard]]
class template deduction
constexpr if
fold expressions

Library:
string_view
optional

This talk also comes with a realization about C++11.

Top11 Talks and other voting results for Meeting C++ 2018

The voting for the talks at Meeting C++ 2018 ended, and the results are in!

Voting results for Meeting C++ 2018

by Jens Weller

From the article:

On Sunday the voting ended for this years conference. And the results are interesting, each talk received between 87 and 104 votes from 147 active voting sessions. In total its 10685 votes casted. So lots of folks did have a look at each talk, the average of the collected votings is then what determines the top talks at the conference...

CppCon 2017: Delegate this! Designing with delegates in modern C++—Alfred Bratterud

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Delegate this! Designing with delegates in modern C++

by Alfred Bratterud

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Designing a fast IP stack from scratch is hard. Using delegates made it all easier for IncludeOS, the open source library operating system written from scratch in modern C++. Our header-only delegates are just as fast as C-style function pointers, compatible with std::function, and allows any object to delegate work to stateful member functions without knowing anything about the class they belong to. We use delegates for everything from routing packets to creating REST endpoints, and most importantly to tie the whole IP stack together. In this talk we’ll show you how we use delegates in IncludeOS, discuss pitfalls and alternatives, and give you all you need to get started.