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C++ Day 2017 event in Italy (Italian only)

A full day of C++ in the Italian language:

C++ Day 2017

December 2, 2017

Modena.

The site and the event are entirely in Italian. Here is a translation of the main information:

In a nutshell

The C++ Day 2017 is a full-day event entirely dedicated to the C++ language, hosted in Modena (Italy), the heart of the so-called Motor Valley: a land displaying the best of the motor and racing world. Companies like Ferrari, Maserati, Lamborghini, Pagani, Ducati reside here.

The event consists in some technical sessions and networking.

Italian C++ professionals will speak (in Italian) on different C++ topics, including: Artificial Intelligence, UI, Interoperability and STL.

 

Who should attend the C++ Day 2017?

This event is made by C++ professionals for C++ professionals, students and enthusiasts. Whoever is interested in the C++ language and is keen on meeting the Italian C++ ecosystem is welcome!

 

What can I find in the C++ Day 2017?

The agenda consists of 5x60' tech talks and 2.5 hours allocated for networking. The event is also an opportunity to meet people working in the Motor Valley.

About the technical sessions, speakers will talk about:

  • (Slightly) Smarter Smart Pointers (Carlo Pescio)
  • C++ & UI: a different approach (Daniele Pallastrelli)
  • Immediate Mode Graphical User Interfaces in C++ (Stefano Cristiano)
  • C/C++ interoperability with other languages (Alberto Bignotti)
  • Artificial Intelligence, today (Sebastiano Galazzo)

Coffee breaks are included, lunch is not: people are encouraged to enjoy the lovely center of the city.

You can refer to the detailed program for more information.
 

When and Where will the C++ Day 2017 take place?

The event will be held on December 2, 2017 at Centro Culturale Alberione, in Modena (Italy). The location is in the center of the city, 10-minute walk from the main train station.

Check-in opens at 8.30 AM, the main event begins at 9.30 AM and will last for a full day.
 

Who supports this event?

Recognition Robotics and Sigeo are our sponsors.

O'Reilly supports the C++ Day with free books.

We are still open to sponsorships. Get in touch if you want to support/sponsor the event!

 

Do I need to register?

The C++ Day 2017 is free, but you must register to facilitate the organization of the event.

You can register here.

Keynotes at Meeting C++ 2017

With the conference just a few weeks away, an update on the 3 awesome keynotes of this years Meeting C++:

Keynotes at Meeting C++ 2017

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Are you excited for Meeting C++ 2017?!? I quickly wanted to give an update on the 3 keynotes at the conference this year! Each day will feature one keynote, where the first two are in the morning, while the Closing Keynote is kind of the last thing to happen before the closing message. Also, all 3 keynote speakers have now (finally) their speaker profile.

ACCU 2018 Call for sessions—ACCU

The ACCU 2018 is now putting together its program, and they want you to speak on C++. The ACCU has a strong C++ track, though it is not a C++-only conference. If you have something to share, check out their

Call for Sessions

by the ACCU

From the article:

ACCU the conference is put on by ACCU the organisation, but is open to anyone who wishes to attend, not just members of the organisation. Obviously ACCU the organisation hopes that anyone not a member that attends ACCU the conference joins ACCU the organisation – and there is a stand at the conference for people to do exactly that.

So for content, ACCU the conference is looking for any material that is interesting to people who create software. Historically, ACCU has a lot of C++ and C content, and is proud of that: ACCU is the foremost annual conference for people interested in C++ and C, at least in and around the UK. But it is not just a C++ and C conference, ACCU is about programming in whatever language people are using, with whatever tools and processes people are using: D, Chapel, Java, Kotlin, C#, F#, Groovy, Rust, Go, Python, Ruby, Lisp, to name just a few programming languages about which there have been sessions at ACCU conferences.

See the 2017 schedule for examples.

The Call for Sessions lasts for about 5 weeks and will close on Friday 2017-11-17 T23:59+00:00.

C++17—Egor Bredikhin

A reminder of what C++17 bring:

C++17

by Egor Bredikhin

From the article:

C++ language is constantly evolving, and for us, as for developers of a static analyzer, it is important to track all its changes, in order to support all new features of the language. In this review article, I would like to share with the reader the most interesting innovations introduced in C++17, and demonstrate them with examples.

CppCon 2017 Trip Report—Isabella Muerte

Yet another interesting report!

CppCon 2017 Trip Report

by Isabella Muerte

From the article:

It's been a few days since I got back from CppCon 2017. As a millenial, I easily cave to peer pressure and because everybody else is doing it, I figured I might as well write a trip report too.

My CppCon 2017 Trip Report – 10 great talks to watch and learn from—Quentin Duval

Yet another trip report.

My CppCon 2017 Trip Report – 10 great talks to watch and learn from

by Quentin Duval

From the article:

The last edition of the CppCon 2017 just ended. As for the previous edition, it was a real pleasure to be there, discussing with talented and curious fellow developers, and watching great talks. In particular, I got the feel that the conference offered more diverse talks than the previous edition...

CppCon 2017 Trip Report—Matt Godbolt

Another trip report!

CppCon 2017 Trip Report

by Matt Godbolt

From the article:

Until last week I had never been to a C++ conference before. I’m rather glad to say that I’ve now experienced the wonder of having a firehose of C++ knowledge plugged into my brain and turned on.

Most of the best times at the conference were in between talks, where random meetings in the hallways over coffee would yield fascinating discussions. I was flattered to have a fair number of people spot my name badge and come up and thank me for Compiler Explorer – a very surreal experience. I got a tiny taste of what it must be to be “famous”! I also got a lot of advice and ideas on how to improve the site, and once the dust settles a little I look forward to getting stuck into improvements, like more Microsoft compilers (and a better compilation experience for those using it), and execution support.

While the hallway chance encounters (and lunches and dinners) yielded a lot of great conversations, the talks were also full of information. Below is a small taste of some of the talks that left an impression with me...