boost

CppCon 2016: Safe Numerics Library—Robert Ramey

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Safe Numerics Library

by Robert Ramey

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

This presentation describes the necessity, utility and usage for a library of safe integer types. These types function in all respects the same way as built-in integers, but guarantee that no integer expression will return an incorrect result. The library can be reviewed at the boost library incubator.

Fuzzing beast with libFuzzer

A short blog post about my experience in fuzzing beast during my boost review

Fuzzing beast with libFuzzer

by Jens Weller

From the article:

During the weekend I wanted to take a closer look at beast, a http library proposed for boost. I planned to write an http client class, as thats something I'll need in some project later anyways. I've been looking at beast on and off for a few month now, and started by reviewing the documentation and examples to get a feel for the library it self.

5 years of Meeting C++

Meeting C++ exists now for 5 years, lets celebrate on the blog:

5 years of Meeting C++

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Just a little bit more then 5 years ago, Meeting C++ went public. Since then, it has been a wild ride and huge success. Today, Meeting C++ reaches over 50k in social media, the conference it self has grown from 150 to 600 in its 5 editions...

Using C++ Coroutines with Boost C++ Libraries—Eric Battalio

Working with the future tools.

Using C++ Coroutines with Boost C++ Libraries

by Eric Battalio

From the article:

Last month, Jim Springfield wrote a great article on using C++ Coroutines with Libuv (a multi-platform C library for asynchronous I/O). This month we will look at how to use coroutines with components of Boost C++ libraries, namely boost::future and boost::asio...

Boost 1.64.0 is released

The new boost is out!

Boost 1.64.0 is released

From the article:

New Libraries


Process:
Process library by Klemens D. Morgenstern, that provides cross platorm ways to allows you to:

  • create child processes
  • setup streams for child processes
  • communicate with child processes through streams (synchronously or asynchronously)
  • wait for processes to exit (synchronously or asynchronously)
  • terminate processes

Broken feature:

GitHub #67: "group.wait() does not return".

Updated Libraries

Any:

  • Suppressed false warnings about returning reference to temporary
  • boost::addressof is now used instead of directly taking the address #12615
  • Headers are not included using double quotes any more #12053
  • CI tests now run with address, leak, and undefined sanitizers
  • Added more test

Atomic:

  • Fixed possible incorrect code generation in 64-bit atomic operations on 32-bit x86 with gcc versions older than 4.7 and compatible compilers.

Config:

  • Added BOOST_NO_CXX11_SFINAE_EXPR defect detection.

...

CppChat[12]: + As a Service

CppChat:

CppChat[12]: + As a Service

with Jackie Kay, Robert Ramey, and Jon Kalb

From the chat:

Jackie, Robert, and Jon discuss Jackie's talk at last week's emBO++ and the upcoming Boost review of Robert's Safe Numerics library. We also discuss Kona, Slack, C++Now, and functional programming C++.

Using QtCreator together with the Visual Studio Build Tools

A first posting about working with Qt and Visual C++ in QtCreator

Using QtCreator together with the Visual Studio Build Tools

by Jens Weller

From the article:

For a while I've been using QtCreator as my IDE, mostly because its deep integration with Qt, as most of my projects are Qt related. With this, I also preferred (and still do a little) to use the MinGW builds of Qt on Windows. In the past, as GCC was a little bit better with the newer standards, today, well, never change a running system...

Ranges: the STL to the Next Level—Jonathan Boccara

Ranges are coming!

Ranges: the STL to the Next Level

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

The C++ Standard Template Library (STL) is a fantastic tool for making code more correct and expressive. It is mainly composed of two parts:

  • The containers, such as std::vector or std::map for instance,
  • The algorithms, a fairly large collection of generic functions that operate amongst others on containers. They are mostly found under the algorithm header.