Product News

GCC 7.3 released

It continues to improve:

GCC 7.3 released

From the article;

This page is a brief summary of some of the huge number of improvements in GCC 7. For more information, see the Porting to GCC 7 page and the full GCC documentation...

Spectre mitigations in MSVC—Andrew Pardoe

If you are a developer whose code operates on data that crosses a trust boundary then you should consider recompiling your code with the /Qspectre switch:

Spectre mitigations in MSVC

by Andrew Pardoe

From the article:

Microsoft is aware of a new publicly disclosed class of vulnerabilities, called “speculative execution side-channel attacks,” that affect many operating systems and modern processors, including processors from Intel, AMD, and ARM...

PVS-Studio 6.21 release: support for CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) was added

PVS-Studio is a tool for bug detection in the source code of programs, written in C, C++, and C#. It works in Windows and Linux environment.

PVS-Studio 6.21 Release

by PVS-Studio Team

What's new:

  • Support for CWE (Common Weakness Enumeration) was added to C/C++/C# analyzers.
  • HTML log with source code navigation can now be saved from Visual Studio plug-ins and the Standalone tool.
  • WDK (Windows Driver Kit) projects for Visual Studio 2017 are now supported.
  • PVS-Studio plug-in for SonarQube was updated for the latest LTS version 6.7.
  • V1007. The value from the uninitialized optional is used. Probably it is a mistake.

Boost 1.66 is out!

New version of boost!

Boost 1.66 is out!

From the article:

New Libraries

  • Beast: Portable HTTP, WebSocket, and network operations using only C++11 and Boost.Asio, from Vinnie Falco.
  • CallableTraits: A spiritual successor to Boost.FunctionTypes, Boost.CallableTraits is a header-only C++11 library for the compile-time inspection and manipulation of all 'callable' types. Additional support for C++17 features, from Barrett Adair.
  • Mp11: A C++11 metaprogramming library, from Peter Dimov.

...

C++17 - The Complete Guide—Nicolai M. Josuttis

The first draft of "C++17 - The Complete Guide" is now available at

C++17 - The Complete Guide

by Nicolai M. Josuttis

About the guide:

Buy early, pay less, free updates.

This book uses a new publishing model: It is written incrementally and self-published. That way you can buy it even before it is complete and I have income while I am still writing it (note that I do C++ for a living).

Most of the new features are covered already in detail:

  • All major new core language features
  • The new library components (filesystem only by a few examples)

But there is still enough to do (see http://www.cppstd17.com/ for details).

All covered features went through significant review with awesome feedback and already have a lot of useful details including how they integrate with other features and discussing all the traps you should avoid.

C++17 Feature Removals And Deprecations—Stephan T. Lavavej

This is about visual studio, but this is also about how the deprecated mechanisms work.

C++17 Feature Removals And Deprecations

by Stephan T. Lavavej

From the article:

Technology advances by inventing new ways of doing things and by discarding old ways. The C++ Standardization Committee is simultaneously adding new features and removing old features at a gradual pace, because we’ve discovered thoroughly better ways of writing code. While feature removals can be annoying, in the sense that programmers need to go change old codebases in order to make them conform to new Standards, they’re also important. Feature removals simplify the Core Language and Standard Library, avoiding the doom of accreting complexity forever. Additionally, removing old features makes it easier to read and write code. C++ will always be a language that offers programmers many ways to write something, but by taking away inferior techniques, it’s easier to choose one of the remaining techniques which are more modern...