intermediate

Fixing the crash that seems to be on a std::move operation--Raymond Chen

Which way do you prefer?

Fixing the crash that seems to be on a std::move operation

by Raymond Chen

From the article:

Last time, we looked at a crash that was root-caused to an order of evaluation bug if compiled as C++14. One solution to the problem is to switch to C++17 mode, but presumably the customer isn’t willing to make that drastic a change to their product yet. Maybe there’s something we can do that is less disruptive...

Strong Types for Safe Indexing in Collections – Part 2--Jonathan Boccara

Are you interested?

Strong Types for Safe Indexing in Collections – Part 2

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

In the previous article on strong types, we set out to find how to use strong types for safe indexing in collections.

More precisely, if we have two vectors with two indices to access them, how can we use strong types to make sure we use the right index for the right vector, and that we don’t swap them by mistake?

How Meeting C++ can help you to close your C++ knowledge gap

Update your C++ skills with Meeting C++!

How Meeting C++ can help you to close your C++ knowledge gap

by Jens Weller

From the article

With 1.5 years of the pandemic behind us and one more "season" ahead for many of us, I'd like to show you how you can improve your C++ skills with the events organized by Meeting C++!

Meeting C++ organizes many online Events on Hubilo with its Meeting C++ online User Group. This started over a year ago and today it hosts 1 - 2 evenings of C++ content per month. Usually a talk or a fair like the online C++ job fair or the book & tool fair. The next meeting of this User Group is next week, hosting Daisy Hollmans CppCon Talk What you can learn from being too cute: why you should write code that you should never write.

Design Patterns VS Design Principles: Observer, State and Strategy

Do you know about them?

Design Patterns VS Design Principles: Observer, State and Strategy

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

In this series of articles on design patterns and design principles, we analyse how the 23 GoF design patterns relate to the 9 GRASP design principles.

In a previous article, we classified the GRASP patterns like this (excluding “Managing complexity”).

The study we perform in this series is helpful to understand better both the GoF and the GRASP, with the goal of taking better decisions when it comes to organizing our code.

The GoF design patterns come from the seminal Design Patterns book. The GRASP design principles are explained in Craig Larman’s Applying UML and Patterns.

In this episode of the series, we examine the Observer, State and Strategy design patterns...