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CppCon 2017: Type Punning in C++17: Avoiding Pun-defined Behavior—Scott Schurr

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Type Punning in C++17: Avoiding Pun-defined Behavior

by Scott Schurr

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Type punning, treating a type as though it is a different type, has a long and sordid history in C and C++. But, as much as we'd like to deny its existence, it plays an important role in efficient low-level code. If you've ever written a program that examines the individual bits of a pointer or of a floating point number, then you've done type punning.

Given its long legacy, some of the techniques for type punning that were appropriate, even encouraged, earlier in history now live in the realm of undefined behavior. We'll identify which techniques are now proscribed and postulate why. We'll also explore ways to do type punning in C++17 that sidestep undefined behavior and are hopefully as efficient as the older techniques.

In this session we will look at:
o Common (and some uncommon) motivations for type punning.
o Techniques for type punning, both good and bad, all ugly.
o Related topics (like type conversions and std::launder()) with an eye toward unspecified and undefined behavior.

CppCon 2017: When a Microsecond Is an Eternity: High Performance Trading Systems in C++—Carl Cook

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

When a Microsecond Is an Eternity: High Performance Trading Systems in C++

by Carl Cook

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Automated trading involves submitting electronic orders rapidly when opportunities arise. But it’s harder than it seems: either your system is the fastest and you make the trade, or you get nothing.

This is a considerable challenge for any C++ developer - the critical path is only a fraction of the total codebase, it is invoked infrequently and unpredictably, yet must execute quickly and without delay. Unfortunately we can’t rely on the help of compilers, operating systems and standard hardware, as they typically aim for maximum throughput and fairness across all processes.

This talk describes how successful low latency trading systems can be developed in C++, demonstrating common coding techniques used to reduce execution times. While automated trading is used as the motivation for this talk, the topics discussed are equally valid to other domains such as game development and soft real-time processing.

Use the official Boost.Hana with MSVC 2017 Update 8 compiler—Bat-Ulzii Luvsanbat

Getting more conforming!

Use the official Boost.Hana with MSVC 2017 Update 8 compiler

by Bat-Ulzii Luvsanbat

From the article:

We would like to share a progress update to our previous announcement regarding enabling Boost.Hana with MSVC compiler. Just as a quick background, Louis Dionne, the Boost.Hana author, and us have jointly agreed to provide a version of Boost.Hana in vcpkg to promote usage of the library among more C++ users from the Visual C++ community. We’ve identified a set of blocking bugs and workarounds and called them out in our previous blog, and stated that as we fix the remaining bugs, we will gradually update the version of Boost.Hana in vcpkg, ultimately removing it and replacing it with master repo. We can conduct this development publicly in vcpkg without hindering new users who take a dependency on the library...

CppCon 2017: Meta—Andrew Sutton

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Meta

by Andrew Sutton

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

For the past several years, I have been researching new languages to support safe and efficient network protocol processing, specifically for software-defined networking applications. The unfortunate outcome of that research is this conclusion: any language for that domain must also be a general purpose programming language. This is not an easy thing to do. Many of the language features I worked with simply generated expressions to compute packet and header lengths, read and write packet fields, and encode and decode entire packets. If we could do this in C++, I might not need an entirely new language.

Over the past year, Herb Sutter and I have collaborated to work on language support for compile-time programming, static reflection, metaclasses, and code generation in the C++ programming language. These facilities completely eliminate the need for the external tools, metacompilers, and domain-specific languages on which we frequently rely to generate high-performance encoders and decoders in C++.

In this talk, I will discuss how to use these evolving proposals to create facilities for encoding and decoding packets. In particular, I will discuss the background requirements of my work, the overall design of a network protocol library, and the reflection and generation facilities that implement the library.

A major update to Meeting C++ recruiting

The job section of Meeting C++ received an important update: you can now share your resume with selected companies via a webform. Also you can share your open positions on the Meeting C++ job board or apply to become listed in the job section as a C++ employer.

A major update for Meeting C++ Recruiting

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Today I can announce a new offering in the recruiting area of Meeting C++: the CV upload form.

The mission of Meeting C++ is to support the C++ community and to build and maintain a worldwide network for C++. And with Meeting C++ recruiting, the goal is to integrate companies into this network, to make them visible as employers, and help people find the right jobs. With this service, I want to bring together companies, who have open positions for C++ Developers and those developers who are looking for a new challenging position!

CppCon 2017: Designing A Feature That Doesn’t Fit—Patrice Roy

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Designing A Feature That Doesn't Fit

by Patrice Roy

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

C++ is a wonderful and expressive language, that gives programmers a lot of freedom even though it actively seeks to let programmers obtain the maximal performance from their hardware. It so happens that sometimes, operating systems can make it easy to do things that are absolutely not natural for a C++ program, but that some C++ programmers consider essential to their practice.

This talk will explore the problem of adding functionality to the language, more specifically to the standard threading library, where said functionality is not a natural fit for the C++ language specification. Expressed otherwise: how can we find ways to meet the needs of users without corrupting the language we all love?

This talk will be more interesting to you if you have met situations where you wanted to do something in "pure C++" but found you had to resort to operating system-specific features to meet your objectives. We will discuss the design space that has been explored for the problem under study, and will try to make emerge the strengths and weaknesses of the various alternatives.

“Modern C++” != “New(est) Standard”—Arne Mertz

What do you think?

“Modern C++” != “New(est) Standard”

by Arne Mertz

From the article:

The term “Modern C++” is often used interchangeably with “Code using the new C++ standard”. Here, “new” may be anything from C++11 to C++17 or even whatever is available of C++20 right now. I think that modern C++ is more and something different than just adding that -std=c++17 flag.

First Meeting Embedded Conference Schedule available

Meeting Embedded is a new conference with a focus on embedded, hosting lots of talks connected to embedded & C++, plus a keynote by Dan Saks!

Meeting Embedded 2018

Schedule

Organized by Jens Weller

From the article:

Meeting Embedded 2018 is a one day event focused on hard and software development for embedded and the IoT. Meeting Embedded will be at Vienna House Andel's Berlin Hotel on the 14th of November, right in front of Meeting C++!

Win a free ticket for C++ on Sea!

The new, upcoming C++ conference "C++ on Sea" offers a free ticket.

Win a free ticket for C++ on Sea!

by C++ on Sea

About the competition:

For a brand new conference the interest in C++ on Sea already has been phenomenal!

Early Bird tickets are available and are already starting to sell - which is really exciting for us (and a little bit nerve wracking - especially after a technical hitch early on).

Amongst those that have heard of us the interest is definitely there, for which we are very grateful.

But we want to reach even more people - and that's where you come in. We'd like you to tweet about the conference.