Video & On-Demand

CppCon 2020 Calling Functions: A Tutorial--Klaus Iglberger

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

Calling Functions: A Tutorial

by Klaus Iglberger

Summary of the talk:

How is a function call resolved? How does the compiler find the right function and how does the compiler choose from a set of available functions? This talk will give an overview of the individual steps taken during the resolution of a function call. It will primarily focus on the different kinds of name lookup, argument deduction, and on overload resolution. Attendees will gain insight into the mechanics of (un-)qualified lookup, argument dependent lookup, two-phase lookup, name hiding, SFINAE, (viable) candiate functions, and ambiguous function calls. They will leave the talk with a much better understanding of the (sometimes surprising) details of function calls.

CppCon 2019 EDSL Infinity Wars: Mainstreaming Symbolic Computation--Joel Falcou, Vincent Reverdy

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

EDSL Infinity Wars: Mainstreaming Symbolic Computation

by Joel Falcou, Vincent Reverdy

Summary of the talk:

Scientists and Developers want the same thing: a simple code that does exactly what it should. For the former, it implies adhering to their knowledge base and domain idioms. For the latter, it means it compiles in a reasonable time frame and without bugs. for both, it better computes fast in the end. One way developers, especially in C++, provides scientists with usable libraries is to design them as Embedded Domain Specific Languages. Alas, in all honesty, if someone asked the Scientists, they will probably state that LaTex is *the* perfect DSLs they practice every day.

This is an old story and even if we only focus on matrix-based libraries, the current landscape of high-performance computing library -- Blaze, Blitz++, EIGEN, Armadillo, etc... -- is proof that those techniques have a decent public following. This is the point where the icky things start: stories of meta-programming, so-called expression templates and their uphill battle against new C++ features: interaction with auto, rvalue-references, move semantics and so on. The authors have spent quite a bit of their coding life trying to play with or around those techniques and this talk is about what they learned during this journey.

This talk will focus on what kind of mistakes, oversights and traps the old kind of scientific EDSLs fell into. We will investigate why the new C++ features didn't help them but pushed them further into a state of ever-growing complexity. We will present our vision of how a modern-C++ friendly EDSL for science can be built. By starting from scratch, this talk will cover the actual requirements of such a library including move-aware expression templates, symbolic formula building, type/value maps, named parameters and static visitors. As a conclusion, we will scheme over various immediate benefits of such an EDSL and new applications that old style libraries could not handle like symbolic simplification, automatic analytical derivation and more.

The Meeting C++ online job fair returns in September!

The next edition of the C++ online job fair organized by Meeting C++ will be on 21s/&22nd September!

The Meeting C++ online job fair returns!

by Jens Weller

From the article:

The first two online events in remo have been a great success. They've been very well received by the C++ community and this event will now be a part of regularly scheduled events for Meeting C++ online. As remo is not available anymore, the event will be hosted in the new online event platform for Meeting C++ 2021. The event will be again on two days: 21st/22nd September, with the first day being in the afternoon and the second day in the evening...

CppCon 2020 A Multi-threaded, Transaction-Based Locking Strategy for Containers--Bob Steagall

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

A Multi-threaded, Transaction-Based Locking Strategy for Containers

by Bob Steagall

Summary of the talk:

With the concurrency tools available in the modern C++ standard library, it is easier than ever to create multi-threaded programs. When we write such applications, there are sometimes cases in which a container simply must be shared among multiple threads. Of course, sharing is trivial if the only operations on the container are reads. In the case where reads greatly outnumber writes, acceptable performance is often attainable with a reader/writer mutex type, like std::shared_mutex. But suppose that the number of writes is similar to, or even greater than, the number of reads -- how does one then perform simultaneous reads and writes on a single container?

One common usage pattern is that, for a given operation, sets of related records are read and updated together. In order to prevent data races and inconsistent views of the data, such sets must be locked together as a unit before any of them can actually be read or updated. Further, it is very easy to accidentally create deadlocks by choosing a seemingly correct locking order. In order to avoid these problems, we would like a locking algorithm that provides three important properties: atomicity, consistency, and isolation.

This talk will describe an algorithm, implemented in C++, that performs such locking based on the concept of strict timestamp ordering. Using only facilities from the C++17 standard library, it employs a straightforward approach to multi-threaded, transactional record locking that requires minimal spatial overhead and yet fulfils the requirements of atomicity, consistency, and isolation. We'll discuss the pros, cons, and limitations of the algorithm, and provide some performance measurements.

CppCon 2019 Time Travel: Applying Gradual Typing to Time Types with Clang's LibTooling--Hyrum Wright

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

Time Travel: Applying Gradual Typing to Time Types with Clang's LibTooling

by Hyrum Wright

Summary of the talk:

Libraries for C++ are constantly evolving, with new APIs being added, old ones being deprecated and functionality continually changing. In past CppCon talks, I've described in abstract how Google manages this change by applying large-scale changes across our C++ codebase using clang's libTooling infrastructure.

In this talk, we'll put this previous work in practice by demonstrating how we use clang-tidy and clang's libTooling library to improve type safety of time types across Google's 250M lines of C++. Using tools currently open sourced as part of clang-tidy, we'll show how the underlying model of time types allow us to migrate from a collection of integers and floating point types to the much more strongly typed `absl::Time` and `absl::Duration` types representing time instants and intervals. Along the way, we'll discover how this process finds existing bugs and prevents new ones from creeping in.

This "gradual typing" technique is not limited to just Time types, and we'll explore how this can be used to improve pointer ownership deduction and other places where more constraining types eliminate classes of bugs.

CppCon 2020 Back to Basics: Exceptions--Klaus Iglberger

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

Back to Basics: Exceptions

by Klaus Iglberger

Summary of the talk:

Exceptions are the native error propagation mechanism in C++. If used properly, exceptions enable us to write simpler, more readable and more robust code. However, the path there can be tricky and unfortunately the exception mechanism isn't without flaws. This talk sheds somelight on the current issues with exceptions and why a large part of the C++ community isn't using them. It also gives guidelines and best practices on how to deal with exceptions and how touse them properly. It will go into detail about the exception safety guarantees, explains the tradeoffs between them, and demonstrates by example the individual steps necessary to reach them.

Embrace Your Problem Domain With Strong Types! -- Richard Thomson

Utah C++ Programmers has released a new video.

Embrace Your Problem Domain With Strong Types!

by Richard Thomson

From the video description:

Every piece of software we write fits into some sort of specific problem domain. Programming isn't about writing programs! Programming is about solving problems. [...]

One area that is often overlooked when modeling our problem domain is coming up with abstractions for the most common and simple values used in our programs. "We need to store a telephone number for the customers in our inventory system." "OK, let's use a std::string, that ought to do it."

That's certainly an expedient solution, but is it a good solution? [...]

This month, Richard Thomson will give us a guided tour on how we can write domain specific types in C++. We'll take a look at facilities provided directly by the language to roll our own types and we'll look at some library solutions that save us from writing lots of boiler plate.

CppCon 2019 A Critical Look at the Coding Standards Landscape--Michael Price

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

A Critical Look at the Coding Standards Landscape

by Michael Price

Summary of the talk:

The C and C++ programming languages are rife with spiky pits, hairpin curves, and loaded footguns, leading industries working with critical systems to embrace strict standards that aim to reduce the amount of damage that can be done with the awesome powers available to them when using these languages.

This session will briefly review what sorts of standards exist in the public today, leading into a serious critique of the more foolish and user-unfriendly aspects of these standards, and finally closing with an optimistic view of “the good parts” of the same.

CppCon 2020 Dealing with Embedded Limitations--Panel Discussion hosted by Ben Saks

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

Dealing with Embedded Limitations

Panel Discussion hosted by Ben Saks

Summary of the talk:

Many embedded systems have requirements on latency, memory usage, and resource consumption. This is especially true of safety-critical and security-related systems. Many programmers and organizations worry that using C++ features will prevent them from meeting these requirements. Some avoid using specific features such as exception handling, while others avoid using C++ entirely.

This panel will discuss the challenges and benefits of using C++ in embedded contexts. We will explore ways that embedded systems can leverage the power of Modern C++ features to meet their guarantees. We will discuss which concerns are based in fact and which concerns are based on misconceptions.
Feel free to bring your own questions about anything that you believe inhibits your use of modern C++ on an embedded system. We will discuss pre-selected questions as well as audience submissions.

CppCon 2019 Some Programming Myths Revisited--Patrice Roy

Registration is now open for CppCon 2021, which starts on October 24 and will be held both in person and online. To whet your appetite for this year’s conference, we’re posting videos of some of the top-rated talks from our most recent in-person conference in 2019 and our online conference in 2020. Here’s another CppCon talk video we hope you will enjoy – and why not register today for CppCon 2021 to attend in person, online, or both!

Some Programming Myths Revisited

by Patrice Roy

Summary of the talk:

We have been taught, or we ourselves have taught, things that we took for granted as being "good practice" in programming. Such things often stem from the "wisdom of the ancients" (although computer science being young as sciences come, some of the "ancients" are still among us and thriving today, and we're so lucky to have them!), and are in effect part of our "myths".

However, being as grounded in the science-that-there-was as these recommendations are, our ideas have evolved, so have our programming languages, and it can be interesting to revisit some of these taken-for-granted ideas.

In C++, particularly in what some call "modern C++", we find a language that is different enough from its forebears to make revisiting our "myths" interesting. How do such things as "goto considered harmful" or "only one return per function", for example, hold as "wisdom" with respect to modern C++? Do they still help us write better programs or should be rethink them under the light of modern languages and practice?

The aim of this talk is to examine what some commonly heard recommendations or advices with respect to programming practice mean in the context of "modern" C++. We will take a small set of such advices, present them in context, show how well (or how badly) they suit today's C++, and try to rephrase them if this seems advantageous.