Video & On-Demand

CopperSpice: Constexpr Static Const

New video on the CopperSpice YouTube Channel:

Constexpr Static Const

by Barbara Geller and Ansel Sermersheim

About the video:

This presentation covers constexpr and how it differs from const. We also discuss what constexpr means in practice versus what is actually required by the standard, a subject which is often misunderstood. The topic of constexpr vs preprocessor macros is also covered with suggestions for best practices.

Please take a look and remember to subscribe!

CppCon 2017: Fantastic Algorithms and Where To Find Them—Nicholas Ormrod

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Fantastic Algorithms and Where To Find Them

by Nicholas Ormrod

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Come dive into some exciting algorithms — tools rare enough to be novel, but useful enough to be found in practice. Want to learn about "heavy hitters" to prevent DOS attacks? Come to this talk. Want to avoid smashing your stack during tree destruction? Come to this talk. Want to hear war stories about how a new algorithm saved the day? Come to this talk! We'll dive into the finest of algorithms and see them in use — Fantastic Algorithms, and Where To Find Them.

CppCon 2017: Boost Your Program’s Health by Adding Fibers to your Coroutine

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Boost Your Program’s Health by Adding Fibers to your Coroutine

by David Sackstein

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

This session is intended to help the advanced programmer to understand what coroutines and fibers are, what problems they solve and how they should be applied in practice.
The session begins with an overview of these concepts, comparing them with threads, and demonstrating how they are exposed by the Boost libraries.
Apart from being clean and succinct as Boost libraries typically are, the authors of these libraries have gone to great lengths to ensure that fibers and coroutines expose a programming model consistent with that of threads. This will make them seem very familiar.
During the session I will demonstrate how fibers and coroutines can be used together with the powerful Boost.Asio library to solve some commonly occurring problems.
To conclude, I will provide some practical tips and guidelines for those who are adding fibers and coroutines to their programming diet.

CppCast Episode 166: CppCon Poster Program and Interface Design with Bob Steagall

Episode 166 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Bob Steagall to discuss his history with C++, the CppCon poster program and his upcoming talks.

CppCast Episode 166: CppCon Poster Program and Interface Design with Bob Steagall

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Bob is a Principal Engineer with GliaCell Technologies. He's been working almost exclusively in C++ since discovering the second edition of The C++ Programming Language in a college bookstore in 1992. The majority of his career was spent in medical imaging, where he led teams building applications for functional MRI and CT-based cardiac visualization. After a brief detour through the worlds of DNS and analytics, he's now working in the area of distributed stream processing. Bob is a relatively new member of the C++ Standardization Committee, and launched a blog earlier this year to write about C++ and topics related to software engineering. He holds BS and MS degrees in Physics, is an avid cyclist, and lives in fear of his wife's cats.

CppCon 2017: Type Punning in C++17: Avoiding Pun-defined Behavior—Scott Schurr

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Type Punning in C++17: Avoiding Pun-defined Behavior

by Scott Schurr

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Type punning, treating a type as though it is a different type, has a long and sordid history in C and C++. But, as much as we'd like to deny its existence, it plays an important role in efficient low-level code. If you've ever written a program that examines the individual bits of a pointer or of a floating point number, then you've done type punning.

Given its long legacy, some of the techniques for type punning that were appropriate, even encouraged, earlier in history now live in the realm of undefined behavior. We'll identify which techniques are now proscribed and postulate why. We'll also explore ways to do type punning in C++17 that sidestep undefined behavior and are hopefully as efficient as the older techniques.

In this session we will look at:
o Common (and some uncommon) motivations for type punning.
o Techniques for type punning, both good and bad, all ugly.
o Related topics (like type conversions and std::launder()) with an eye toward unspecified and undefined behavior.

CppCon 2017: When a Microsecond Is an Eternity: High Performance Trading Systems in C++—Carl Cook

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

When a Microsecond Is an Eternity: High Performance Trading Systems in C++

by Carl Cook

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Automated trading involves submitting electronic orders rapidly when opportunities arise. But it’s harder than it seems: either your system is the fastest and you make the trade, or you get nothing.

This is a considerable challenge for any C++ developer - the critical path is only a fraction of the total codebase, it is invoked infrequently and unpredictably, yet must execute quickly and without delay. Unfortunately we can’t rely on the help of compilers, operating systems and standard hardware, as they typically aim for maximum throughput and fairness across all processes.

This talk describes how successful low latency trading systems can be developed in C++, demonstrating common coding techniques used to reduce execution times. While automated trading is used as the motivation for this talk, the topics discussed are equally valid to other domains such as game development and soft real-time processing.

CppCast Episode 165: Formal Verification with Matt Fernandez

Episode 165 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Matt Fernandez from Intel Labs to discuss Formal Verification.

CppCast Episode 165: Formal Verification with Matt Fernandez

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Matthew Fernandez is a Research Scientist with Intel Labs. Matt began his programming career building Windows GUI applications and designing databases, before moving into operating system architecture and security. He has a PhD in formal verification of operating systems from the University of New South Wales in Australia, and worked with the Australian research group Data61. In the past, he has worked on compilers, device drivers and hypervisors, and now spends his days exploring new tools and techniques for functional correctness and verification of security properties. On the weekends, you can usually find Matt in a park with a good book, hunting for good coffee or helping a newbie debug their code. He hopes to avoid saying “monad” on this podcast.

CppCon 2017: Building Better Worlds: Developing a Procedural City Tool for Alien…—Alan Bucior

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Building Better Worlds: Developing a Procedural City Tool for Alien...

by Alan Bucior

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

When MPC was asked to create a massive CG city for the film Alien: Covenant, they looked to leverage procedural generation as a means for iterating on the overall shape and structure of the city, in place of a prohibitively large team of environment artists. After evaluating all the practical third party options, it was ultimately decided that the best option was to build a custom tool to procedurally assist artists' city-building skills. This allowed for rapid iteration on the overall look of the city by striking a balance between manual and procedural techniques.

The core algorithms were written in C++ for speed. The user interface was written in Python to accommodate quick feature changes, and a dash of Fabric Engine's KL helped with model import and rendering. This multi-language approach allowed the consistent application of the "best tool for the job" rule, which is a common pattern at MPC, allowing flexible teams with experts in a variety of skillsets.

This talk will detail the history and development of MPC's city building tool, "Machi". Alan Bucior, Lead Developer of Machi, reviews the algorithms for city layout and building placement, discusses how to implement algorithms in an artist-driven manner, and shares various insights gleaned through the development process and discussion with stakeholders.

CppCon 2017: Meta—Andrew Sutton

Have you registered for CppCon 2018 in September? Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2017 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Meta

by Andrew Sutton

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

For the past several years, I have been researching new languages to support safe and efficient network protocol processing, specifically for software-defined networking applications. The unfortunate outcome of that research is this conclusion: any language for that domain must also be a general purpose programming language. This is not an easy thing to do. Many of the language features I worked with simply generated expressions to compute packet and header lengths, read and write packet fields, and encode and decode entire packets. If we could do this in C++, I might not need an entirely new language.

Over the past year, Herb Sutter and I have collaborated to work on language support for compile-time programming, static reflection, metaclasses, and code generation in the C++ programming language. These facilities completely eliminate the need for the external tools, metacompilers, and domain-specific languages on which we frequently rely to generate high-performance encoders and decoders in C++.

In this talk, I will discuss how to use these evolving proposals to create facilities for encoding and decoding packets. In particular, I will discuss the background requirements of my work, the overall design of a network protocol library, and the reflection and generation facilities that implement the library.

CppCast Episode 164: SYCL with Gordon Brown

Episode 164 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Gordon Brown to discuss his work on SYCL the OpenCL abstraction layer for C++.

CppCast Episode 164: SYCL with Gordon Brown

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Gordon is a senior software engineer at Codeplay Software in Edinburgh, specialising in designing and implementing heterogeneous programming models for C++. Gordon spends his days working on ComputeCpp; Codeplay's implementation of SYCL and contributing to various standards bodies including the Khronos group and ISO C++. Gordon also co-organises the Edinburgh C++ user group and occasionally blogs about C++. In his spare time, Gordon enjoys dabbling in game development, board games and walking with his two dogs.