Video & On-Demand

CppCast Episode 121: PLF List with Matt Bentley

Episode 121 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Matt Bentley to talk about his work on plf::list and discuss some updates from the SG14 Working Group.

CppCast Episode 121: PLF List with Matt Bentley

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Matt Bentley was born in 1978 and never recovered from the experience. He started programming in 1986, completing a BSc Computer Science 1999, before spending three years working for a legal publishing firm, getting chronic fatigue syndrone, quitting, building a music studio, recovering, getting interested in programming again, building a game engine, and stumbling across some generalized solutions to some old problems.

CppCon 2017: What Has My Compiler Done for Me Lately? Unbolting the Compiler’s Lid—Matt Godbolt

The CppCon 2017 endnote is now available! What an excellent talk by Matt, of Godbolt fame.

What Has My Compiler Done for Me Lately? Unbolting the Compiler's Lid

by Matt Godbolt

From the article:

In 2012, Matt and a colleague were arguing whether it was efficient to use the then-new-fangled range for. During the discussion a bash script was written to quickly compile C++ source and dump the assembly. Five years later and that script has grown into a website relied on by many to quickly see the code their compiler emits, to compare different compilers' code generation and behaviour, to quickly prototype and share code, and investigate the effect of optimization flags.

In this talk Matt will not only show you how easy (and fun!) it is to understand the assembly code generated by your compiler, but also how important it can be. He'll explain how he uses Compiler Explorer in his day job programming low-latency trading systems, and show some real-world examples. He'll demystify assembly code and give you the tools to understand and appreciate how hard your compiler works for you.

He'll also talk a little about how Compiler Explorer works behind the scenes, how it is maintained and deployed, and  share some stories about how it has changed over the years. By the end of this session you'll be itching to take your favourite code snippets and start exploring what your compiler does with them.

CppCon 2017: Qt as a C++ Framework: History, Present State and Future—Lars Knoll

New video!

Qt as a C++ Framework: History, Present State and Future

by Lars Knoll

From the article:

Qt is one of the largest and most widely used C++ frameworks. It is fully cross-platform, covering all functionality required to develop advanced graphical applications. The talk will go through important parts of Qt's history from it's roots to what it is today. We will have a look into the relation between Qt and C++, some of the design philosophies driving the evolution of Qt. I'll go through the current state of the frameworks, latest releases, ongoing development focus, and give an outlook into the future.

CppCon 2017: Meta: Thoughts on generative C++—Herb Sutter

You should see it!

Meta: Thoughts on generative C++

by Herb Sutter

From the article:

Two years ago, I started to focus on exploring ways that we might evolve the C++ language itself to make C++ programming both more powerful and simpler. The only way to accomplish both of those goals at the same time is by adding abstractions that let programmers directly express their intent—to elevate comments and documentation to testable code, and elevate coding patterns and idioms into compiler-checkable declarations. The work came up with several potential candidate features where judiciously adding some power to the language could simplify code dramatically, while staying true to C++'s core values of efficient abstraction, closeness to hardware, and the zero-overhead principle.

The first two potential candidate features from that work to be further developed and proposed for ISO C++ are the <=> unified comparison operator (minor) and what I've provisionally called "metaclasses" as a way to generatively write C++ types (major). This talk is about the latter, and includes design motivation, current progress, and some live online compiler demos using the prototype Clang-based compiler built by Andrew Sutton and hosted at godbolt.org.

CppCon 2017: C++ as a “Live at Head” Language—Titus Winters

New video of Cppcon!

C++ as a "Live at Head" Language

by Titus Winters

From the article:

Engineering is programming integrated over time. That is to say, as much as it can be difficult to get your code to build and run correctly, it is manifestly harder to keep it working in the face of changing assumptions and requirements. This is true no matter the scale, from a small program to a shared library. Only two solutions have been shown to be theoretically sound: never change or provide no compatibility guarantees. What if there were a third option? What if we took the question of maintenance out of the realm of theory and moved it to practice? This talk discusses the approach we've used at Google and how that intersects with other languages, package management, API and ABI compatibility, and a host of other software engineering practices. The particulars of C++ as a language and an ecosystem make it well positioned for a different approach: Live at Head.

CppCon 2017: Learning and Teaching Modern C++—Bjarne Stroustrup

Cppcon 2017 opening keynote by Bjarne Stroustrup is now live.

Learning and Teaching Modern C++

by Bjarne Stroustrup

From the article:

We – attendees at CppCon – are all teachers. Some teach for a living; many occasionally teach a course or give a lecture; essentially all give advice about how to learn C++ or how to use C++. The communities we address are incredibly diverse.

What do we teach, and why? Who do we teach, and how? What is “modern C++”? How do we avoid pushing our own mistakes onto innocent learners?

Teaching C++ implies a view of what C++ is; there is no value-neutral teaching. What teaching tools and support do we need? Consider libraries, compiler support, and tools for learners. This talk asks a lot of questions and offers a few answers. Its aim is to start a discussion, so the Q&A will be relatively long.

CppCast Episode 119: C# and IL2CPP with Josh Peterson

Episode 119 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Josh Peterson from Unity 3D to talk about C# and some of the similarities and differences between the Managed language and C++, he also talks about his work at Unity 3D on IL2CPP.

CppCast Episode 119: C# and IL2CPP with Josh Peterson

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Josh is a programmer working at Unity Technologies, where he focuses on integration and development of scripting runtimes for the Unity 3D game engine. He enjoys learning about CPU architectures and assembly language, including the recent development of an MOS 6510 emulator in C#. In his free time, he coaches a number of youth soccer teams and reads philosophy and theology.