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4 Features of Boost HOF That Will Make Your Code Simpler--Jonathan Boccara

Convinced?

4 Features of Boost HOF That Will Make Your Code Simpler

by Jonathan Boccara

From the article:

Boost HOF, standing for Higher Order Functions, is a Boost library offering functions that work on functions.

This impressive library provides a lot of advanced components allowing to go a step further into functional programming in C++. In this post, we’ll focus on 4 of the more basic ones (+ a bonus one) that allow to make code simpler in common tasks.

HOF provides one header in the form of #include <boost/hof/XXX.hpp> for each component, as well as a general header #include <boost/hof.hpp>. It is compatible with C++11...

One Trick with Private Names and Function Templates--Bartlomiej Filipek

Will you use it?

One Trick with Private Names and Function Templates

by Bartlomiej Filipek

From the article:

Last time in my blog post about How to Share Code with Const and Non-Const Functions in C++ I had a custom type declared and defined in one place (like in a header file). Recently, I tried to separate the declaration from implementation, and I got into a situation where one private function template was left.

In this article, I’d like to show you one trick that allowed me to convert this function template into a non-member function without giving up private details of the class...

Interactive C++ for Data Science--Vassil Vassilev, David Lange, Simeon Ehrig, Sylvain Corlay

Helping research.

Interactive C++ for Data Science

by Vassil Vassilev, David Lange, Simeon Ehrig, Sylvain Corlay

From the article:

In our previous blog post “Interactive C++ with Cling” we mentioned that exploratory programming is an effective way to reduce the complexity of the problem. This post will discuss some applications of Cling developed to support data science researchers. In particular, interactively probing data and interfaces makes complex libraries and complex data more accessible users. We aim to demonstrate some of Cling’s features at scale; Cling’s eval-style programming support; projects related to Cling; and show interactive C++/CUDA...

Under the Covers of C++ Lambdas: Captures, Captures, Captures--Andreas Fertig

Lambdas.

Under the Covers of C++ Lambdas: Captures, Captures, Captures

by Andreas Fertig

From the article:

Lambda Capturing syntax allows us to quickly “wrap” a variable from the outside scope and then use it in the lambda body. We also know that under the hood the compiler translates lambda into a closure type… but what happens to those captured variables? Are they translated to public data members or private? See the newest guest post from Andreas to understand this tricky problem...

Quick Q: Why do I have to access template base class members through the this pointer?

Quick: in order to make x a dependent name, so that lookup is deferred until the template parameter is known

Recently on SO:

Why do I have to access template base class members through the this pointer?

If the classes below were not templates I could simply have x in the derived class. However, with the code below, I have to use this->x. Why?

template <typename T>
class base {

protected:
    int x;
};

template <typename T>
class derived : public base<T> {

public:
    int f() { return this->x; }
};

int main() {
    derived<int> d;
    d.f();
    return 0;
}

Teresa Johnsons Meeting C++ 2020 Center Keynote: ThinLTO Whole Program Optimization

Taking a look at next weeks keynote by Teresa Johnson

Teresa Johnsons Center Keynote: ThinLTO Whole Program Optimization: Past, Present and Future

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Whole program optimization enables higher performance in C++ applications, because of the expanded scope for analysis and optimization. Traditionally, whole program optimization is not scalable in memory or time, and doesn't support effective incremental builds. ThinLTO (Thin Link Time Optimization) is a new compilation model that...

A look at next weeks Meeting C++ 2020 online conference

Looking at how next weeks Meeting C++ 2020 will be online

A look at next weeks Meeting C++ 2020 online conference

by Jens Weller

From the article:

First, Meeting C++ 2020 is an online conference, the planned onsite part is canceled. More about this in the last paragraph, as first, lets look whats happening next week!

The online part

Next weeks conference will consist of two tracks hosted in remo, one for talks and one for communication/networking/live video chat...