News

C++Now 2019 Schedule Announcement

C++Now 2019 will be held in Aspen, Colorado, from May 5-10. Registration is still open!

Schedule Announced: Over 50 Presentations in 3 Tracks

From the announcement:

This year we have 3 tracks with over 50 C++-focused presentations including keynotes, lightning talks, panels, and the “Library in a Week” hands-on workshop.

If you are still on the fence about whether to join us, now is a good time to make up your mind. Check out the list of session tags, the conference schedule, and the attendee video. The venue has a hard attendee limit and if the conference sells out (as it tends to do), your remaining option is to wait until 2020.

doctest—The Fastest C++ Testing Framework—version 2.3 released!—Viktor Kirilov

doctest brings the ability of compiled languages such as D, Rust and Nim to write tests right next to the production code to C++.

doctest - "The Fastest C++ Testing Framework" - version 2.3 released

by Viktor Kirilov

From the article:

Version 2.3 brings an extensible reporter system and a few already implemented reporters with the framework - most importantly one for XML - vital for Continuous Integration (CI) workflows. Huge thanks to the Catch2 project for paving the way for single header testing libraries.

C++ Now 2019 Keynote Announcement: Compile Time RegEx by Hana Dusíková

C++Now 2019 will be held in Aspen, Colorado, from May 5-10. Registration is still open!

Keynote Announced: Hana Dusíková on Compile Time Regular Expressions

From the announcement:

The theme of this year’s keynotes is Compile-time Magic and the first keynote that we are announcing is Hana Dusíková’s presentation of a library that performs at compile-time, work that is often done at runtime.

Hana’s keynote is entitled Compile Time Regular Expressions with Deterministic Finite Automaton.

Call for papers—code::dive

code::dive 2019 just started its call for papers until the end of 2019-06-30.

Call for papers

by code::dive

About the conference:

code::dive 2019 is the 6th edition of the code::dive conference, taking place at Cinema New Horizons at Wrocław, Poland, on 20-21 of November. The conference is organized by Nokia Wrocław.

Expressing fire-and-forget coroutines more explicitly, -or- How to turn any coroutine into fire-...

The series continues.

Expressing fire-and-forget coroutines more explicitly, -or- How to turn any coroutine into fire-and-forget

by Raymond Chen

From the article:

Last time, we looked at how to mark a coroutine as fire-and-forget, meaning that the caller does not get any information about when the coroutine completes. This is fine as far as it goes, but it may not be what you want...

Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Kona, February 2019—Botond Ballo

Everything you need to know.

Trip Report: C++ Standards Meeting in Kona, February 2019

by Botond Ballo

From the article:

A few weeks ago I attended a meeting of the ISO C++ Standards Committee (also known as WG21) in Kona, Hawaii. This was the first committee meeting in 2019; you can find my reports on 2018’s meetings here (November 2018, San Diego), here (June 2018, Rapperswil), and here (March 2018, Jacksonville). These reports, particularly the San Diego one, provide useful context for this post...

winrt::fire_and_forget was too forgetful

Heard about it?

winrt::fire_and_forget was too forgetful

by Raymond Chen

From the article:

C++/WinRT provides a handy helper class called winrt::fire_and_forget. It lets you specify that nobody is going to observe the result of the coroutine. This is handy because it lets you tell the compiler that the lack of observation is intentional, so it won’t generate a warning...