2019

Cpp On Sea 2019 Trip Report—Arne Mertz

Were you there?

Cpp On Sea 2019 Trip Report

by Arne Mertz

From the article:

From February 3rd through February 6th I have been in Folkestone, UK, to visit the first C++ On Sea conference.

There must be something in the water on that island that enables them to organize fantastic conferences like ACCUConf and, since this year, C++ On Sea.
C++ On Sea is definitely the best conference I have ever been to, and here’s a little glimpse why I think so...

HPX V1.2.1 released—STE||AR Group

The STE||AR Group has released V1.2.1 of HPX -- A C++ Standard library for parallelism and concurrency.

HPX V1.2.1 Released

The newest version of HPX (V1.2.1) is now available for download! Please see here for the release notes. This release is a pure bug fix release that addresses a couple of compatibility problems (in particular with Boost V1.69). We have also included some important improvements that were merged since the previous release.

    HPX is a general purpose parallel C++ runtime system for applications of any scale. It implements all of the related facilities as defined by the C++ Standard. As of this writing, HPX provides the only widely available open-source implementation of the new C++17 parallel algorithms. Additionally, HPX implements functionalities proposed as part of the ongoing C++ standardization process, such as large parts of the C++ Concurrency TS, Parallelism TS V2, data-parallel algorithms, executors, and many more. It also extends the existing C++ Standard APIs to the distributed case (e.g. compute clusters) and for heterogeneous systems (e.g. GPUs).

    HPX seamlessly enables a new Asynchronous C++ Standard Programming Model that tends to improve the parallel efficiency of our applications and helps reducing complexities usually associated with parellism and concurrency.

 

2 Lines Of Code and 3 C++17 Features - The overload Pattern—Bartlomiej Filipek

Proof that you can do more!

2 Lines Of Code and 3 C++17 Features - The overload Pattern

by Bartlomiej Filipek

From the article:

While I was doing research for my book and blog posts about C++17 several times I stumbled upon this pattern for visitation of std::variant:

template<class... Ts> struct overload : Ts... { using Ts::operator()...; };
template<class... Ts> overload(Ts...) -> overload<Ts...>;

std::variant<int, float> intFloat { 0.0f };
std::visit(overload(
    [](const int& i) { ... },
    [](const float& f) { ... },
  ),
  intFloat;
);

With the above pattern, you can provide separate lambdas “in-place” for visitation.

It’s just two lines of compact C++ code, but it packs a few interesting concepts.

Let’s see how this thing works and go through the three new C++17 features that enable this one by one.

C++ on Sea Videos Are Now Being Released

The videos from last week's conference are now starting to go up on YouTube.

C++ on Sea Videos Are Now Being Released

by C++ on Sea

From the article:

After a fantastic conference last week we're now starting to process and upload the videos to YouTube. We have a channel on YouTube you can subscribe to, or keep checking back to see the latest videos. Please do share them around!