October 2017

CppCast Episode 122: Abseil with Titus Winters

Episode 122 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Titus Winters from Google to talk about the Open Sourcing of Google's Abseil library.

CppCast Episode 122: Abseil with Titus Winters

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Titus Winters has spent the past 6 years working on Google's core C++ libraries. He's particularly interested in issues of large scale software engineer and codebase maintenance: how do we keep a codebase of over 100M lines of code consistent and flexible for the next decade? Along the way he has helped Google teams pioneer techniques to perform automated code transformations on a massive scale, and helps maintain the Google C++ Style Guide.

Most interesting innovations in C++17

C++ language is constantly evolving, and for us, as for developers of a static analyzer, it is important to track all its changes, in order to support all new features of the language.

Most interesting innovations in C++17

by Egor Bredikhin

From the article:

Fold expressions, template<auto>, constexpr if, constexpr lambdas, *this capture in lambda expressions, inline variables, structured bindings, __has_include, std: byte type and so on.

 

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released—John Montgomery

Good news from the Visual Studio blog:

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released

by John Montgomery

Notable C++ development highlights:

You can now use CMake for Linux C++ development in Visual Studio, which allows you to use CMake based projects that target Windows, Linux, or both. Simply open a folder with your CMake project, select Linux as your target and upon connecting to your Linux machine your sources are synchronized for you. Once the CMake cache generation is complete you’ll have full IntelliSense for your project and targets for building, running and debugging within Visual Studio. In addition to CMake support for Linux C++ development, with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4 Preview you can now benefit from CMake version 3.9 and improved support for projects with multiple CMakeLists.


Windows Application Packaging Project: In Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4, you will get the first peek at a new project template that enables Windows desktop apps created with .NET or C++ to be packaged inside an .appx package for easier distribution via side-loading or submission to the Microsoft Store. These templates work for both new Windows desktop projects, as well as for existing projects.

CppCon 2017 Trip Report—Isabella Muerte

Yet another interesting report!

CppCon 2017 Trip Report

by Isabella Muerte

From the article:

It's been a few days since I got back from CppCon 2017. As a millenial, I easily cave to peer pressure and because everybody else is doing it, I figured I might as well write a trip report too.

My CppCon 2017 Trip Report – 10 great talks to watch and learn from—Quentin Duval

Yet another trip report.

My CppCon 2017 Trip Report – 10 great talks to watch and learn from

by Quentin Duval

From the article:

The last edition of the CppCon 2017 just ended. As for the previous edition, it was a real pleasure to be there, discussing with talented and curious fellow developers, and watching great talks. In particular, I got the feel that the conference offered more diverse talks than the previous edition...

CppCast Episode 121: PLF List with Matt Bentley

Episode 121 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Matt Bentley to talk about his work on plf::list and discuss some updates from the SG14 Working Group.

CppCast Episode 121: PLF List with Matt Bentley

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Matt Bentley was born in 1978 and never recovered from the experience. He started programming in 1986, completing a BSc Computer Science 1999, before spending three years working for a legal publishing firm, getting chronic fatigue syndrone, quitting, building a music studio, recovering, getting interested in programming again, building a game engine, and stumbling across some generalized solutions to some old problems.