July 2017

Your own error code—Andrzej Krzemieński

The stl can help you!

Your own error code

by Andrzej Krzemieński

From the article:

I was recently implementing the “classification of error conditions” in my application offered by the functionality behind std::error_code. In this post I want to share some of my experience and insight.

CppCon 2016: The C++17 Parallel Algorithms Library and Beyond—Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

The C++17 Parallel Algorithms Library and Beyond

by Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

One of the major library features in C++17 is a parallel algorithms library (formerly the Parallelism Technical Specification v1). The parallel algorithms library has both parallel versions of the existing algorithms in the standard library and a handful of new algorithms inspired by common patterns from parallel programming (such as std::reduce() and std::transform_reduce()).

We’ll talk about what’s in the parallel algorithms library, and how to utilize it in your code today. Also, we’ll discuss some exciting future developments relating to the parallel algorithms library which are targeted for the second version of the Parallelism Technical Specification – executors, and asynchronous parallel algorithms.

Announcing the Student and Accessibility tickets for Meeting C++ 2017!

The programs for student and accessibility tickets are open until October 15th!

Announcing the Student and Accessibility tickets

by Jens Weller

From the article:

This is the 4th year where Meeting C++ is offering free tickets for students. Since last year, there is also a contingent for the underrepresented and those, not able to afford a Meeting C++ ticket.

Zero-allocation continuations in C++17 — Vittorio Romeo

This series of articles show the design and implementation of future-like asynchronous computation chains that do not require any dynamic memory allocation or type erasure. 

by Vittorio Romero

From the article:

I'd like to show an alternative design [for futures] that doesn't require any allocation whatsoever and still enables users to build up asynchronous computation chains using facilities such as `when_all` and `.then`. [...] The idea behind it is to encode the entire computation chain into a single object with a huge type.

Trip report: Summer ISO C++ standards meeting (Toronto)—Herb Sutter

wg21-toronto-city-e1500123984972.pngThe Toronto ISO C++ meeting just concluded:

Trip report: Summer ISO C++ standards meeting (Toronto)

by Herb Sutter

From the article:

A few minutes ago, the ISO C++ committee completed its summer meeting in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We had some 130 people at the meeting, representing nine national bodies. As usual, we met for six days Monday through Saturday, including several evenings.

The following are some highlights of what we achieved this week...

CppCon 2016: Make Friends with the Clang Static Analysis Tools—Gabor Horvath

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Make Friends with the Clang Static Analysis Tools

by Gabor Horvath

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

This talk is an overview of the open source static analysis tools for C++. The emphasis is on Clang based tools. While this talk is not intended to be a tutorial how to develop such tools I will cover the algorithms, methods and interesting heuristics that are utilized by them. Understanding these methods can be really useful as it helps us write more static analysis friendly code and understand the cause of false positive results. It will also help to understand limitations of the currently available tools. I will also present some guidelines how to make a library static analysis friendly, to make clients interested in such tools happy. I will also give a short tutorial on how to use these tools and how to integrate them into the work flow.

CppCast Episode 109: CopperSpice with Barbara Geller and Ansel Sermersheim

Episode 109 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Barbara Geller and Ansel Sermersheim to talk about the CopperSpice C++ GUI Library.

CppCast Episode 109: CopperSpice with Barbara Geller and Ansel Sermersheim

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewees:

Barbara is an independent consultant working as a programmer and software developer for over 25 years. She has been a featured speaker at more than a dozen trade shows and computer conferences in the US and on two separate occasions Barbara taught an extended class in software architecture and GUI design for the Panama Canal Commission in Panama.

Ansel has been working as a programmer for over 15 years. Ansel worked for 8 years at a communications company designing scalable, high performance, multi-threaded network daemons in C++ and he is currently a software consultant for RealityShares in San Francisco.

What’s in C++20 and the C++17 final score card

What's in C++20 and the C++17 final score card: A report from Kona and look at the Toronto C++ meeting
Posted on July 10, 2017 by Michael Wong.

I am writing this blog long after my trip to the Kona C++ standard meeting due to unusually high business commitments post-meeting and using it as an opportunity to also look ahead to the C++20 content to be reviewed in Toronto. I will publish my usual update to the C++17 content slidedeck similar to my Dec 2016 Issaquah trip report. This will contain the final score card for C++17, including all the features with links, and an evaluation scorecard of what made it in based on what Bjarne had earlier suggested in 2015 as possible content for C++17.