June 2017

The rise of the new language MC++—CppDepend Team

A new language?

The rise of the new language MC++

by CppDepend Team

From the article:

During  the last few years we talk about the “C++ Renaissance”. We have to admit that Microsoft was a major actor of this movement, I remember this video where Craig Symonds and Mohsen Agsen talked about it.

In 2011 Microsoft announced in many articles the come back of C++, and Microsoft C++ experts like Herb Sutter did many conferences to explain why C++ is back and mostly recommend the use of Modern C++. In the same time the standard C++11 was approved and we begin to talk about  C++ as new  language...

C++17 in details: Templates—Bartlomiej Filipek

What's new in C++17?

C++17 in details: Templates

by Bartlomiej Filipek

From the article:

Do you work a lot with templates and meta-programming?
With C++17 we get a few nice improvements: some are quite small, but also there are notable features as well! All in all, the additions should significantly improve writing template code.

Today I wrote about:

  • Template argument deduction for class templates
  • template<auto>
  • Fold expressions
  • constexpr if
  • Plus some smaller, detailed improvements/fixes

BTW: if you’re really brave you can still use concepts! They are merged into GCC so you can play with them even before they are finally published.

CppCon 2016: Deploying C++ modules to 100s of millions of lines of code—Manuel Klimek

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

Deploying C++ modules to 100s of millions of lines of code

by Manuel Klimek

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Compile times are a pain point for C++ programmers all over the world. Google is no exception.. We have a single unified codebase with hundreds of millions of lines of C++ code, all of it built from source. As the size of the codebase and the depth of interrelated interfaces exposed through textually included headers grew, the scaling of compiles became a critical issue.

Years ago we started working to build technology in the Clang compiler that could help scale builds more effectively than textual inclusion. This is the core of C++ Modules: moving away from the model of textual inclusion. We also started preparing our codebase to migrate to this technology en masse, and through a highly automated process. It's been a long time and a tremendous effort, but we'd like to share where we are as well as what comes next.

In this talk, we will outline the core C++ Modules technology in Clang. This is just raw technology at this stage, not an integrated part of the C++ programming language. That part is being worked on by a large group of people in the ISO C++ standards committee. But we want to share how Google is using this raw technology internally to make today's C++ compiles faster, what it took to get there, and how you too can take advantage of these features. We will cover everything from the details of migrating a codebase of this size to use a novel compilation model to the ramifications for both local and distributed build systems. We hope to give insight into the kinds of benefits that technology like C++ Modules can bring to a large scale C++ development environment.

CppCast Episode 107:  and move semantics with Howard Hinnant

Episode 107 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Howard Hinnant from Ripple to talk about <chrono>, his date & time library (and proposal) and his work on move semantics.

CppCast Episode 107: <chrono> and move semantics with Howard Hinnant

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Howard Hinnant is a Senior Software Engineer at Ripple and the lead author of several C++11/14 features including: move semantics, unique_ptr, chrono, condition_variable_any, shared_mutex and std::lock. He is also the lead author of two LLVM projects libc++ and libc++abi.

Making things do stuff – Part 6—Glennan Carnie

The series continues.

Making things do stuff – Part 6

by Glennan Carnie

From the article:

As code designers we tend to eschew specific ‘stove-pipe’ code in favour of reusable code elements.  Up until now we’ve been coding some very specific examples so it’s probably worth looking at some more generic solutions.

In this article we’ll look at building generic register manipulation classes (or, as one commenter referred to them, ‘register proxy’ classes).  Here, we’re really exploring code design rather than coding ‘mechanics’.  I’m using this to explore some factors like the balance between efficiency, performance and flexibility...

Making things do stuff – Part 5—Glennan Carnie

The series continues.

Making things do stuff – Part 5

by Glennan Carnie

From the article:

We’ve been looking at using C++ to manipulate I/O hardware.   Previously, we’ve looked at the fundamentals of hardware manipulation; and how to encapsulate these mechanisms into classes.  If you’ve not been following along I’d recommend reading the previous articles first before continuing.

This time we’ll explore a lesser-known feature of C++ and its application in hardware manipulation – placement new...

CppCon 2016: AAAARGH!? Adopting Almost Always Auto Reinforces Good Habits!?—Andy Bond

Have you registered for CppCon 2017 in September? Don’t delay – Registration is open now.

While we wait for this year’s event, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2016 for you to enjoy. Here is today’s feature:

AAAARGH!? Adopting Almost Always Auto Reinforces Good Habits!?

by Andy Bond

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Prominent members of the C++ community are advocating the "almost-always-auto" idiom, but there are understandable concerns from many about its implications. This case study will demonstrate how it may be applied in different situations, suggest ways to avoid performance penalties, introduce algorithms to minimize the "almost" part, and discuss the overall impact.

PVS-Studio 6.16 released

PVS-Studio is a static code analyzer that detects errors and potential vulnerabilities in the source code of programs written in C/C++/C#. Version 6.16 has obtained 11 new general analysis diagnostics.

PVS-Studio 6.16 released

by Andrey Karpov

About the release:

In a sense, this is a milestone for us. The thing is that we cannot add more numbers of general analysis warnings, otherwise they will concur with the numbers of micro-optimization diagnostics. It seemed to us that the list of 300 diagnostics was endless, but now it is over and we got to the point of 800, where we have micro-optimization diagnostics. In the next release we plan to resume numbering the general-analysis warnings with V1000. Download and enjoy the new version of PVS-Studio now by clicking here.

P.S. How to use PVS-Studio for Free.

P0724R0: Merge the Concepts TS Working Draft into the C++20 working draft—Ville Voutilainen

A new WG21 paper is available. If you are not a committee member, please use the comments section below or the std-proposals forum for public discussion.

Document number: P0724R0

Date: 2017-06-27

Merge the Concepts TS Working Draft into the C++20 working draft

by Ville Voutilainen

Excerpt:

The proposal is to merge the Concepts TS Working Draft into the C++20 Working Draft as is, and fix remaining issues, including design issues, before the publication of C++20.