Fast incremental sort—Lars Hagen

Lars Hagen describes in his blog post a strategy to solve the problem of a fast incremental sort.

Fast incremental sort

by Lars Hagen

From the article

I recently came across the need for an incremental sorting algorithm, and started to wonder how to do it optimally.

The incremental sorting problem is described here, and is an “online” version of partial sort. That is, if you have already sorted kk elements, you should be able to quickly sort k+1k+1 elements, and so on.

Incremental sorts can be useful for a number of cases:

  • You want sorted items, but you don’t know how many elements you’ll need. This could often happen when you are filtering the resulting sequence, and you don’t know how many items will be filtered out.
  • You are streaming the sequence, so even though you want the whole sequence, you want the first elements as quickly as possible.

We’ll see how branch misprediction and other constant factors can make the naive asymptotically optimal version far slower than a practical implementation.

CppCast Episode 54: VS for Linux with Ankit Asthana

Episode 54 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Ankit Asthana to discuss new features for Visual Studio and VS Code. Including new support for Linux developers.

CppCast Episode 54: VS for Linux with Ankit Asthana

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Ankit Asthana is a program manager working in the Visual C++ Cross-Platform space. He is knowledgeable in cross-platform technologies, compilers (dynamic and static compilation, optimizer, code generation), distributed computing and server side development. He has in the past worked for IBM and Oracle Canada as a developer building Java 7 (hotspot) and telecommunication products. Ankit back in 2008 also published a book on C++ titled C++ for Beginners to Masters which sold over a few thousand copies.

The status of reflection in C++—Axel Naumann

Axel Naumann writes about the state of the reflection in C++ in his recent article.

The status of reflection of C++

by Axel Naumann

From the article:

When the C++ committee met in Jacksonville two months ago, something big happened: the reflection study group, SG7, decided what the basic “language" of reflected C++ should look like. What does that mean? Why do you care? Let me, the co-author of the only “blessed proposal", explain...

Schedule for ACCU 2016 has been published

The schedule for the annual ACCU Conference has just been published. The conference will be held at Marriott Hotel  City Centre, in Bristol, UK, on April 19-23, 2016. The conference is focused on professionalism in programming, but as always the schedule contains a lot of talks about C++.

 

ACCU is a small and friendly conference, typically 400+ attendees living together in the same hotel for a week discussing everything about programming. Most of the talks(60+) are 90 minutes, with long breaks inbetween, inviting to deep and insightful discussions both during and after the sessions. If you are into programming, especially C++, this is a conference that you might want to consider.

 

 

CppCast Episode 53: Boost Hana with Louis Dionne

Episode 53 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason by Louis Dionne to discuss C++ metaprogramming with Boost Hana.

CppCast Episode 53: Boost Hana with Louis Dionne

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Louis is a math and computer science enthusiast with interest in C++ (meta)programming, functional programming, domain specific languages and related subjects. He is an active member of the Boost community, and recently wrote the Boost.Hana metaprogramming library.

The Ultimate Question of Programming, Refactoring, and Everything

Yes, you've guessed correctly - the answer is "42". In this article you will find 42 recommendations about coding in C++ that can help a programmer avoid a lot of errors, save time and effort.

The Ultimate Question of Programming, Refactoring, and Everything

by Andrey Karpov

From the article:

The scope of my interests − the C/C++ language and the promotion of code analysis methodology. I have been Microsoft MVP in Visual C++ for 5 years. The main aim of my articles and work in general - is to make the code of programs safer and more secure. I'll be really glad if these recommendations help you write better code, and avoid typical errors. Those who write code standards for companies may also find some helpful information here.