October 2017

Keynotes at Meeting C++ 2017

With the conference just a few weeks away, an update on the 3 awesome keynotes of this years Meeting C++:

Keynotes at Meeting C++ 2017

by Jens Weller

From the article:

Are you excited for Meeting C++ 2017?!? I quickly wanted to give an update on the 3 keynotes at the conference this year! Each day will feature one keynote, where the first two are in the morning, while the Closing Keynote is kind of the last thing to happen before the closing message. Also, all 3 keynote speakers have now (finally) their speaker profile.

Overload 141 is now available—ACCU

ACCU’s Overload journal of October 2017 is out. It contains the following C++ related articles.

Overload 141

From the index:

'Speedy Gonzales' Serializing (Re)Actors via Allocators

Polymorphism in C++ - A Type Compatibility View

Open Source - And Still Deceiving Programmers

C++11 (and Beyond) Exception Support

ACCU 2018 Call for sessions—ACCU

The ACCU 2018 is now putting together its program, and they want you to speak on C++. The ACCU has a strong C++ track, though it is not a C++-only conference. If you have something to share, check out their

Call for Sessions

by the ACCU

From the article:

ACCU the conference is put on by ACCU the organisation, but is open to anyone who wishes to attend, not just members of the organisation. Obviously ACCU the organisation hopes that anyone not a member that attends ACCU the conference joins ACCU the organisation – and there is a stand at the conference for people to do exactly that.

So for content, ACCU the conference is looking for any material that is interesting to people who create software. Historically, ACCU has a lot of C++ and C content, and is proud of that: ACCU is the foremost annual conference for people interested in C++ and C, at least in and around the UK. But it is not just a C++ and C conference, ACCU is about programming in whatever language people are using, with whatever tools and processes people are using: D, Chapel, Java, Kotlin, C#, F#, Groovy, Rust, Go, Python, Ruby, Lisp, to name just a few programming languages about which there have been sessions at ACCU conferences.

See the 2017 schedule for examples.

The Call for Sessions lasts for about 5 weeks and will close on Friday 2017-11-17 T23:59+00:00.

C++17—Egor Bredikhin

A reminder of what C++17 bring:

C++17

by Egor Bredikhin

From the article:

C++ language is constantly evolving, and for us, as for developers of a static analyzer, it is important to track all its changes, in order to support all new features of the language. In this review article, I would like to share with the reader the most interesting innovations introduced in C++17, and demonstrate them with examples.

CppCast Episode 122: Abseil with Titus Winters

Episode 122 of CppCast the only podcast for C++ developers by C++ developers. In this episode Rob and Jason are joined by Titus Winters from Google to talk about the Open Sourcing of Google's Abseil library.

CppCast Episode 122: Abseil with Titus Winters

by Rob Irving and Jason Turner

About the interviewee:

Titus Winters has spent the past 6 years working on Google's core C++ libraries. He's particularly interested in issues of large scale software engineer and codebase maintenance: how do we keep a codebase of over 100M lines of code consistent and flexible for the next decade? Along the way he has helped Google teams pioneer techniques to perform automated code transformations on a massive scale, and helps maintain the Google C++ Style Guide.

Most interesting innovations in C++17

C++ language is constantly evolving, and for us, as for developers of a static analyzer, it is important to track all its changes, in order to support all new features of the language.

Most interesting innovations in C++17

by Egor Bredikhin

From the article:

Fold expressions, template<auto>, constexpr if, constexpr lambdas, *this capture in lambda expressions, inline variables, structured bindings, __has_include, std: byte type and so on.

 

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released—John Montgomery

Good news from the Visual Studio blog:

Visual Studio 2017 Version 15.4 Released

by John Montgomery

Notable C++ development highlights:

You can now use CMake for Linux C++ development in Visual Studio, which allows you to use CMake based projects that target Windows, Linux, or both. Simply open a folder with your CMake project, select Linux as your target and upon connecting to your Linux machine your sources are synchronized for you. Once the CMake cache generation is complete you’ll have full IntelliSense for your project and targets for building, running and debugging within Visual Studio. In addition to CMake support for Linux C++ development, with Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4 Preview you can now benefit from CMake version 3.9 and improved support for projects with multiple CMakeLists.


Windows Application Packaging Project: In Visual Studio 2017 version 15.4, you will get the first peek at a new project template that enables Windows desktop apps created with .NET or C++ to be packaged inside an .appx package for easier distribution via side-loading or submission to the Microsoft Store. These templates work for both new Windows desktop projects, as well as for existing projects.