C++ and the Google Summer of Code

I wrote an overview over this years Google Summer of Code and C++

C++ and the Google Summer of Code

by Jens Weller

From the Article:

During the last few weeks I got interested in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC), as I did read some emails on the boost mailing lists about it. The Google Summer of Code is for a lot of open source projects an important opportunity to improve and extend their code base, and in 2014 it happens for the 10th time!

Range Concepts, To Infinity And Beyond

The 4th part in Erics series on ranges:

Range Concepts, Part 4 of 4: To Infinity And Beyond

by Eric Niebler

From the Article:

Last time, I introduced a new concept, Iterable, and showed how it solved many of the problems with pair-of-iterator-style ranges. This time around, I’m going to extend Iterable in small ways to make programming with infinite ranges safer and more efficient. Disclaimer: The ideas in this post are more speculative than in the previous three. I’m looking forward to the disucussion.

C++17: I See a Monad in Your Future!

Thoughts on Monads and Futures in C++

C++17: I See a Monad in Your Future!

by Bartosz Milewski

From the Article:

If you thought you were safe from functional programming in your cozy C++ niche, think again! First the lambdas and function objects and now the monad camouflaged as std::future. But do not despair, it’s all just patterns. You won’t find them in the Gang of Four book, but once you see them, they will become obvious.

N3956: ISO/IEC CD 14882, C++ 2014, Responses to National Body Comments—Barry Hedquist

A new WG21 paper is available. A copy is linked below, and the paper will also appear in the next normal WG21 mailing. If you are not a committee member, please use the comments section below or the std-proposals forum for public discussion.

Note: This document summarizes the responses to all national comments in last year's CD ballot for C++14, which ballot resolution was completed this month at the Issaquah meeting. C++14 is now about to go out for its next ballot stage, DIS (Draft International Standard).

Document number: N3956

Date: 2014-02-24

ISO/IEC CD 14882, C++ 2014, Responses to National Body Comments

by Barry Hedquist

Excerpt:

Attached is a complete set of the WG21 Responses to National Body Comments in response to the SC22 Ballot for ISO/IEC CD 14882, Committee Draft of the revision of ISO/IEC 14882:2011, aka C++ 2014.

Range Concepts, Part 3 of 4: Introducing Iterables

The third part of Eric Nieblers Series on ranges

Range Concepts, Part 3 of 4: Introducing Iterables

by Eric Niebler

From the Article:

In the last two blog posts, I describes the challenges I’ve encountered while building a next-generation range library. In this post, I’ll sketch for you my proposed solution: refinements of the range concepts that allow delimited, infinite, and pair-o’-iterator-style ranges to fit comfortably within the concept hierarchy without loss of performance or expressive power and with increased safety. I’ve built a range library around these concepts that subsumes and extends all of the C++98 STL algorithms and the Boost.Range adaptors, so I can say with confidence that these concepts lead to a useful and consistent generic range library.

Quick Q: How can I make my constructor take a list of things, like map and vector?—StackOverflow

Quick A: By having your constructor take an initializer_list<> of the appropriate type.

Today on StackOverflow:

Constructor similar to std::map or std::vector in a class

I'm creating a class and I want to know how to create a constructor similar to the std::map or std::vector style.

std::map<std::string, std::string> map = {
    {"foo", "bar"},
    {"biz", "buz"},
    {"bez", "boz"}
};

The difference is that I don't want my class to ask for types that wants to accept, just like std::map does.

std::map<std::string, std::string>

I want my class to accept that style of arguments:

{
    {"foo", "bar"},
    {"biz", "buz"},
    {"bez", "boz"}
};

But with defined type. (std::string, Typer)

The 'Typer' is a class that I will insert as value on the std::map.

Thank you.

Clang 3.4 and C++14

With the technical completion of C++14 (we think) reported on Monday, we'd like to link to this recent post for your Friday reading pleasure to recap some of the features of C++14.

There are other articles summarizing C++14 features, but some of the short code examples in this one go beyond what we've seen posted elsewhere and are quite interesting. For example, check out primes.

Clang 3.4 and C++14

by Scott Prager

From the article:

With each new release, gcc and clang add on more C++11 and C++14 features. While clang has been behind on some features, though ahead on others, they now claim to have C++1y all worked out...