Video & On-Demand

CppCon 2014 An Overview of C++11/14, Part I—Leor Zolman

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

An Overview of C++11/14, Part I

by Leor Zolman

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

This accelerated introduction to C++11/14 surveys most of the key additions to the C++ language, including support for increased code clarity (lambdas, uniform initialization, auto, new OOD control) and improved performance (rvalue references, move semantics and perfect forwarding.)

The presentation is designed for those who truly need a quick overview of the new C++, so the focus is on breadth rather than depth. Whenever feasible, new language features are presented in a style showcasing how they improve over their "Old C++" counterparts.

CppCast Episode 5: Exploring CLion with Anastasia Kazakova—Rob Irving

Episode 5 of CppCast, the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode Anastasia Kazakova from JetBrains joins Rob Irving to discuss the new CLion IDE.

CppCast Episode 5: Exploring CLion with Anastasia Kazakova

by Rob Irving

About the interviewee:

Being a C/C++ fan since University Anastasia has been creating real-time *nix-based systems and pushing them to production for 8 years. She has a passion for networking algorithms (especially congestion problems and network management protocols) and embedded programming, and believes in good tooling. Now she is a part of the JetBrains team working as a Product Marketing Manager for CLion the upcoming cross-platform C/C++ IDE.

CppCon 2014 Generic Programming with Concepts Lite, Part II—Andrew Sutton

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Generic Programming with Concepts Lite, Part II

by Andrew Sutton

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

In this talk, I will give an overview of the Concepts Lite language extension for C++ and present examples of its use in design and implementation of real-world generic libraries. Concepts Lite provides the ability for programmers to directly state constraints on template arguments as part of the template declaration. These constraints are predicates which determine whether or not a template argument can be used with that template. Constraints are checked by the compiler at the point of use, meaning that that effectively constrained generic libraries will not suffer from the usual problems of insane diagnostics. Libraries written using concepts will be far more readable and maintainable than the status quo. This talk will focus on generic programming, proposed language features, and their use in building real-world libraries.

Concepts Lite is a forthcoming ISO Technical Specification (TS) aimed at publication alongside C++14. Concepts Lite is implemented in a branch of GCC, which will be made available to the audience for experiments and experience.

CppCon 2014 Generic Programming with Concepts Lite, Part I—Andrew Sutton

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Generic Programming with Concepts Lite, Part I

by Andrew Sutton

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

In this talk, I will give an overview of the Concepts Lite language extension for C++ and present examples of its use in design and implementation of real-world generic libraries. Concepts Lite provides the ability for programmers to directly state constraints on template arguments as part of the template declaration. These constraints are predicates which determine whether or not a template argument can be used with that template. Constraints are checked by the compiler at the point of use, meaning that that effectively constrained generic libraries will not suffer from the usual problems of insane diagnostics. Libraries written using concepts will be far more readable and maintainable than the status quo. This talk will focus on generic programming, proposed language features, and their use in building real-world libraries.

Concepts Lite is a forthcoming ISO Technical Specification (TS) aimed at publication alongside C++14. Concepts Lite is implemented in a branch of GCC, which will be made available to the audience for experiments and experience.

CppCon 2014 Metaprogramming with Boost.Hana: Unifying Boost.Fusion and Boost.MPL—Louis Dionne

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Metaprogramming with Boost.Hana: Unifying Boost.Fusion and Boost.MPL

by Louis Dionne

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Template metaprogramming sucks. No, seriously; you might like the imposed purely functional paradigm, but not the templates themselves. While C++11 has made our life easier, even simple metaprograms are often hard to write, impossible to maintain and slow to compile; we need better abstractions. In this talk, I will present Boost.Hana[1], an experimental C++14 library for heterogeneous computation. The library takes metaprogramming to a whole new level of expressiveness by unifying the well-known Boost.MPL and Boost.Fusion libraries under a single generic, purely functional interface. The library incorporates some of the most recent advances in C++ metaprogramming; I will give an overview of the most interesting implementation techniques used internally. Finally, I will show concrete ways to use the library so you, as a developer, can write less template black magic, increase your productivity and spend less time in coffee breaks waiting for the compiler (sorry).

CppCast Episode 4: Cmake, Git and Functional Programming with David Sankel—Rob Irving

Episode 4 of CppCast, the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode David Sankel joins Rob Irving to talk about his upcoming C++Now! talk where he will be discussing the use of Cmake and Git in large C++ projects. We also touch on David's expertise with functional programming.

CppCast Episode 4: Cmake, Git and Functional Programming with David Sankel

by Rob Irving

About the interviewee:

David Sankel is a professional software developer/architect based in the USA. His prolific software developments have included CAD/CAM, computer graphics, visual programming languages, web applications, computer vision, and cryptography. He is a frequent speaker at the C++Now! conferences and is especially well known for his advanced functional programming in C++ talks.

David's current research interests include dependently typed languages, semantic domains, EDSLs, and functional reactive programming. He currently works for the software firm, Stellar Science.

CppCon 2014 Quick Game Development with C++11 / C++14—Vittorio Romeo

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Quick Game Development with C++11 / C++14

by Vittorio Romeo

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Modern C++ has made game development a much more pleasurable experience. Features such as smart pointers and variadic templates are invaluable in speeding up the development process and in making the code cleaner and more robust. New easy-to-use multimedia libraries such as SFML, SDL and Cinder make dealing with graphics, sounds and input very easy, and work well with modern code principles. This talk guides the audience through the creation of an Arkanoid/Breakout clone in under 200 lines of code, using C++11/C++14 features and idioms. Chronologically sequential code segments, compiled and executed one by one, will show the attendees how a game is created from scratch, slowly becoming a playable product, step by step. The end result will be a small game, completely written in modern C++ code. Topics covered will range from basic graphics programming to entity management and collision detection/response.

Dive into C++11 - [5] - Game entity management basics

The intended audience for this tutorial/screencast are people who have some experience with C++ in general, and who watched the previous episodes. This episode also teaches the basics of polymorphism and component-based design.

Dive into C++11: Episode 5

by Vittorio Romeo.

From the author: 

I greatly appreciate comments and criticism, and ideas for future videos/tutorials. Feel free to fork/analyze the source code at: https://github.com/SuperV1234/Tutorials You can find the previous episodes here: Playlist

CppCon 2014 Accept No Visitors—Yuriy Solodkyy

While we wait for CppCon 2015 in September, we’re featuring videos of some of the 100+ talks from CppCon 2014. Here is today’s feature:

Accept No Visitors

by Yuriy Solodkyy

(watch on YouTube) (watch on Channel 9)

Summary of the talk:

Visitor Design Pattern was an attempt to overcome a limitation of object-oriented languages - inability to retroactively introduce new polymorphic functions. While it was quite efficient in providing extensibility of functions, it was never truly retroactive, easy to teach, use or maintain, and it achieved this at the cost of hindering extensibility of classes, introduction of control inversion and requiring tons of boilerplate code to be written. Visitor Design Pattern is a workaround, not a solution to the problem and in this talk I would like to discuss a more elegant yet as efficient solution in the form of a Match statement. We will look at several use-cases for the Visitor Design Pattern, their encoding using both approaches and ultimately their advantages and disadvantages.

CppCast Episode 3: Cross Platform Mobile C++ in Visual Studio with Ankit Asthana—Rob Irving

Episode 3 of CppCast, the only podcast by C++ developers for C++ developers. In this episode Ankit Asthana joins Rob Irving to talk about the new features in Visual Studio 2015 that enable C++ developers to build and debug Android applications from Microsoft's popular IDE.

CppCast Episode 3: Cross Platform Mobile C++ in Visual Studio with Ankit Asthana

by Rob Irving

About the interviewee:

Ankit Asthana is a program manager working in the Visual C++ Cross-Platform space. He is knowledgeable in cross-platform technologies, compilers (dynamic and static compilation, optimizer, code generation), distributed computing and server side development. He has in the past worked for IBM and Oracle Canada as a developer building Java 7 (hotspot) and telecommunication products. Ankit back in 2008 also published a book on C++ titled C++ for Beginners to Masters which sold over a few thousand copies.